Macro - Discussion & Photos

stevo

nativebeehives.com
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I liked this one because of the bright light and sharpness. Blue Banded Bees are always hard to capture because they never stay still



Five Eyes... Notice the three eyes on top of the head. They are called simple eyes or ocelli. They don’t see images but detect light…

Species - Stingless Bees - Tetragonula Carbonaria



Also seen here with the Solitary Bee - Fire Tailed Resin Bee
 

ClissAT

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As always, Stevo, I find your photos to be stupefyingly beautiful!

I saw an iridescent blue (or green) native bee (or was it a wasp?) in real life in my house yesterday & was struck by how tiny it was compared to your large monitor sized photo. :thumbsup:
 
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stevo

nativebeehives.com
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Blue Banded Bees. The males roost on thin twigs at night.

I saw these two setting themselves up in the afternoon on this twig. This is inside my chicken coop, so I went in there about an hour ago with the camera and grabbed a few shots. I had the camera set up on the tripod, and used a torch to shine on the bees and get the focus.

The depth of field is quiet shallow, a fraction of a millimetre, so I focused on the eyes to get the detailed eye pattern. You can see the outer eye is in focus but then the mandibles are out of focus, that would be a fraction of a millimetre difference in distance. The closer you get the shallower the depth of field (along with aperture) so it's quite a challenging type of photography