Young stone fruit trees should fruit be removed?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Flatland, Nov 3, 2016.

  1. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2016
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    53
    Climate:
    Arid, Desert, or Dry
    Planted a lot of stone fruit trees last winter so this is their first year. They have all come out in leave & are looking healthy & strong. Several have got young fruit on them. Will it harm the tree to bare fruit in their first year. Don't want to harm my trees but at the same time would love to get a couple of home grown peaches & nectarines.
     
  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,713
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    The standard operation is to remove the fruit because the notion is the young tree is better putting it's energy into growing rather than fruit production.

    Most fruit trees are grafted older stock onto young vigorous rootstock so in a way the graft doesn't know it's on a young tree so in effect manually removing the set fruit is acting as nature when most fruit trees have a period of maturity to allow the tree to establish before producing.

    Having said that, I have experimented both ways (removing the fruit and leaving it on) over the past 10 years and can't say that I have noticed a big difference in tree growth or health.
     
  3. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2016
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    53
    Climate:
    Arid, Desert, or Dry
    That's interesting. My nectarine tree has so many fruit on it that I decided to take at least some off because I don't think the branches could take the weight. But I think I will let it keep the rest. The apricot & peach have only got one or two so they may as well stay.
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,713
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    There's truth to the practice of removing fruit in order to increase the remaining fruit quality and size - they commonly do this for apples.
     
  5. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    841
    Likes Received:
    338
    Location:
    SE Queensland, Australia
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I have been removing the fruit, but left 2 peaches on :) Lemons trees keep producing new buds, they really want to fruit :) But as Mark said I'm making them put their energies into growing as a tree.
     
  6. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2015
    Messages:
    679
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    Preston, QLD
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Indeed the limbs have to be strong enough to take the weight if the fruits, especially mangoes and apples and there is a science to fruit thinning based on each variety of fruit. Some need more thinning than others.
     
Loading...

Share This Page