Question Which veggies should I mulch?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Ezra, May 27, 2019.

  1. Ezra

    Ezra Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Yacka, South Australia
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Howdy all, I'm a new gardener two hours north of Adelaide who recently picked up some woodchip mulch I think its from eucalyptus and pine trees as their are some leaves/needles of those trees in there.

    I've heard from Marks video on mulching that some plants don't like to be mulched at the base and was wondering what common veggies to avoid mulching to the base of, any help would be greatly appreciated, cheers.
     
  2. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    3
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Hi Ezra , personally I wouldn't use wood chip or pine needles on veggies , I think they would have an acid effect on the soil , I guess you need to check your ph first with a simple kit from the produce store etc if you have alkaline soils this may be a good idea, we use broken down grasses , Lucerne excellent but expensive or if you can grow your own and slash , really self sufficient, I think mulching too close to plants probably refers particularly to trees where collar rot can kill the tree or shrub, hope this helps , the main thing is to get started and plant something of use ,happy gardening, cheers Raymondo
     
  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    619
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Yes Ezra, Ray is right, don't use wood chip on the vegie garden.
    You can use it on the pathways between the beds but not on the bed itself.
    Use soft mulches around soft plants, hard mulches around hard plants that need only permanent mulching.
    As Ray said, do a pH test before applying mulch so you know what sort of mulch will benefit your soil best.
    I have used sawdust on beds in the past but only because the pH of the soil allowed it. Pine sawdust (untreated) will actually help with soil texture and is a good addition to compost heaps.
    What was being used by the previous gardener?
    Can you ask questions of that person?
    Record your conversation with that person on your phone so you don't miss a thing.
     
  4. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    3
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Absolutely right Clissat , I used to buy fresh chook manure from pullets which were basically free to roam in a huge pen covered in sawdust after 3 months they cleaned out the manure/ sawdust mix, it smelt like dark chocolate , very loose and easy to use and turned my heavy soil into a dream mix. Sawdust initially robs some nitrogen from the mix however there is enough for your crop and when the sawdust breaks down it then releases the nitrogen back into the soil , a sort of slow release, really a win/win situation , you have however to find a chook farm where you can get it , my supply stopped some years back, good luck and happy gardening Raymondo
     
  5. Ezra

    Ezra Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Yacka, South Australia
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Thank you both for taking your time to help me out. There was no previous owner as I built the garden bed myself from dirt around the yard that only had some weeds and a bit of grass in before hand. My Dad said the soil is slightly alkaline so a bit of acid might help. I have however read that pine needles are acidic but I've also read that it is a myth so I'm not sure what to believe anymore I'm wondering do either of you have any experience using it and did it change your ph?
    Sorry for many questions but what's the problem with hard mulches around soft plants? Is it an issue that it's there year round? I can go buy some hay for mulch but trying to be resourceful and save money by using what I have.
     
  6. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2019
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    3
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Hi Ezra , I once used pine needles to mulch strawberries because I needed a slightly more acidic soil than I had , I lost the lot , every single one , take a look at a pine trees and see what is growing underneath, nothing ,no grass no weeds and certainly not veggies, soft mulches add humus to the soil will feed the worms , add micro nutrients it's a plus plus plus your soil will improve every year , if you are short on mulch ( grass clippings are ok ) use a couple of layers of newspaper over well watered soil with grass on top to hold it down , this will contain moisture in the ground and the paper breaks down over a couple of months , just remember you need to feed your worms ,animal manures and soft mulches are a smorgasbord for them and in turn they dig your garden for free , not a bad deal methinks , good luck and happy gardening cheers Raymondo
     
  7. TinaBen

    TinaBen New Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    For veggies we follow the Charles dowding "no dig" approach and mulch all our growing beds once a year with home made compost. Thus works well in our climate (north island NZ) and means you dont gave to feed plants as you gave already fed the soil.
     
  8. Mark Seaton

    Mark Seaton Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Collie WA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    One note on the chicken manure/scrap. i got 4 bags from my neighbor of pen base, do a mixture of straw, manure, sawdust etc. However, I didn't look close enough as they fed their chooks seed and when I spread this around new beds I was planning, I ended up with more weeds than i ever had before. It was easy to just dig back in, but I will be digging it back in for years to come now.
    My dad showed me the best way to deal with this, he does it on sheep manure he collects, that is tip it on the ground and throw lawn clipping over top of it. This is just a fast compost which cooks the seeds as it breaks down. Definitely something I will be doing from now on.
     
  9. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,346
    Likes Received:
    619
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    • Like Like x 1
Loading...

Share This Page