What's growing really well in your subtropical garden at the moment?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Mark, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Location:
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    I live in a subtropical climate so I thought I would start this subtropical thread about what's growing well in my garden at this time of year (in fact, as at today) - feel free to join in :)

    The theory is, over time people can match dates to members locations and know if that person can grow a particular fruit or vegetable really well at a certain time of year then anyone in that region can grow the same thing! Make sense? It's a bit like a developing "grow map" thread :idea:

    Remember, to make this work whatever you detail in your post must be growing well (thriving) right at the time of posting and also your location needs to be made available (in your profile area).

    Let me start this thread off with a few entries in this post. I took the following pics today (nearly 2 months into winter):

    Strawberries - These are growing in a barrel and I also like to grow them under a few herbs coriander and dill (strawberries are a good plant to grow underneath taller plants). Started a few months ago in autumn my strawberries are peaking now. I expect they will fruit right into the start of summer.
    Carrots - I sowed my carrot seed mid-autumn and although they can grow all year here I find this is the best time of year to grow them. They are ready for harvest now and will continue to mature for the next few months.
    Iceburg Lettuce - I can only grow this type of lettuce (densely hearting variety) at the coldest time of year and this means sowing towards the end of autumn so they mature now in mid-winter.

    Kohlrabi - Similar to a swede but better tasting in my opinion. Boiled like a potato it tastes like a cross between a potato and a squash. Very nice! Also, easy to grow mine are growing great at this time of year (even in heavy soil). Perfect for organic growing as it's tough outer skin protects the tuber - you will get slug damage but it doesn't affect the vegetable. Its sparse foliage means cabbage butterfly rarely lays eggs for her caterpillars.

    Loquat - The fruit is a little smaller than an egg, yellow when ripe, with two/three small easy to remove seeds. The taste is sweet and a bit like a cross between a mango and an orange - it's yummy. Best thing about this fruit is it ripens now late winter when our fruit fly is dormant therefore its soft skin doesn't get stung. Fruits profusely and is a fast growing tree - I/we love it!

    Mammoth Rock Cabbage - Awesome heirloom cabbage with purple tight heads - very hardy. Mine were planted from seedling about 8 weeks ago and are maturing now and thriving! No need to harvest right away as they will last for several weeks in the garden. Keep extremely well in the crisper too.

    Mini-Snap Peas - Grow very fast and mine are loving this time of year. I like the mini variety because even if they mature into peas the whole pod and peas can still be eaten without getting stringy.

    Pomegranate - I have two pomegranate trees a dwarf and a larger variety. The dwarf also produces small fruit which I'm not too keen about because they tend to be dry and don't form as good as the larger variety. The image is of my large variety from a tree of only 12 months old - they do grow fast and the fruit is outstanding in salads or drinks. Mine are maturing now and besides my citrus and loquat is one of only a few other fruit trees that fruit through winter in my garden.

    Tomato Black Plum - A heirloom variety and a ripper of a tomato. Good disease resistance and a nice in between size similar to an egg shaped plum. Compact flesh and tasty. Took about 75 - 85 days to maturity and fruiting. Does well in the colder months.

    barrel strawberries with coriander and dill 600 text.jpg carrot just pulled.jpg iceburg lettuce 600 text.jpg kohlrabi 600 text.jpg Loquat fruit 600 text.jpg mammoth rock cabbage text.jpg mini snap peas text.jpg Pomegranate tree fruit 600 text.jpg tomato black plum text 600.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2013
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  2. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Great, keep it going Mark. It has already helped with when to plant some carrots, I got some purple carrot seeds as well to give a go. Question though with this year it's still so hot would you hold off planting the carrot seeds until it cools down a bit?

    I want to know when to plant butter nut pumpkin? I need to find an area to plant them so they can just go for it and not be in an area that needs to be clear for mowing.
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Purple carrots are great to grow! I would put them now (you can sow carrots in SEQ from about now until the start of spring) but make sure they don't dry out because carrots are typically sown in pretty loose soil so they can root easily this can also mean the soil drains/dries faster so I would give them a light sprinkle daily in this heat until established.

    Butternut pumpkins are a top choice also because they are easier to grow than other pumpkins and they taste good. Maybe sow them soon because they need a long season to grow. This heat won't help but if you sow in location they'll probably pop up as it's cooling in April. You can climb butternuts up a structure instead of letting them run if you like to save space just support the pumpkins with a little bird netting underneath as they get bigger.
     
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  4. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks Mark, I'll get onto them soon. We have lots of things we are doing around here so it's kind of what's priority. I can't start a full veg patch just now so are looking at things I can plant in existing garden beds as they currently need redoing, but I am going to use them for veggies in the short term. Spuds is another thing I am keen to start on.

    With pumpkin they are easy to dehydrate as well. I grate it, blanch it if you want to keep the colour, then dehydrate. It re hydrates really easy and quickly since it's grated. Then can be used how you would normally use pumpkin. :)
     
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  5. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Just came across this informative post and want to congratulate you on it Mark.
    All of that produce looks great, and it's fortunate living in such a moist sub-tropical environment - you have the best of both worlds, climate and agricultural variety.
    Time to sow carrots and lettuce seeds...
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2015
  6. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah it's nearly the anniversary of that first post - how time flys! This (autumn/winter) is the best time of year to grow most vegetables if you live in SEQ.
     
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