What kind of bugs?

Jake Jeffries

Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Feb 7, 2020
23
6
21
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Hi everyone,
I'm just wondering if I should be worried about these bugs, I'm not to sure what they are and there's alot of eggs, the eggs are only on one plant, it's been raining for the last two days, it's the first time iv seen this happen, if anyone could help that would be great, thanks.
 

Attachments

AZ Orchard

Active Member
Premium Member
Feb 8, 2020
92
15
31
Arizona, USA
Climate
Arid, Desert, or Dry
Your pictures were perfect, I just couldn't find a way to zoom on my computer.
I have been scouring the internet trying to find those eggs and what could match the pictures of the bugs.
The closest I could find were pictures of bark aphids or oak aphids ( maybe I am just getting stuck on Aphids LOL ).
I am not able to insert the link, but if you google "giant bark aphid" and "whatsthatbug.com" the article
should come up so that you can view the pictures.
The eggs they show do not have the thread attached like yours, so I am stumped ...
 

ClissAT

Valued Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Sep 27, 2015
1,842
906
361
Pomona, Qld
Climate
Sub-Tropical
It would help us Jake, to know what country you are in.
In Australia, those eggs could belong to large biting black ants!
But clearly, those critters are not ants!
They might be wood lice.
But more importantly, when you create individual and isolated ecosystems such as pot plants, the critters will always get out of balance.
Usually it's the bad critters that win.
Sunlight is often the elixir required to solve most imbalance issues, even when the actual plant doesn't like the extra sunlight.
It looks like the pots might have been subjected to a lot of rain because the wood chip is very sodden.
Is it possible to place the pots somewhere so they can dry out a bit?
That might reduce the critters a bit in the short term.
Then I think you will have to spray the pots with some sort of bug spray such as a generic like Bug Spray for Roses.
But just spray the wood chip mulch, not the whole plant.
Or remove the wood chip from the pots and spread it in the sun to dry to kill those critters while the potting medium also dries out a bit.
 

Jake Jeffries

Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Feb 7, 2020
23
6
21
Climate
Sub-Tropical
I live in Australia in North Queensland, we have been having alot of rain in the past month, I did have them in a sunner place, mostly afternoon sun, but where getting sun burnt so I moved them to a shader spot, morning sun till about 12:30 then is shaded out by the house.
I'll move them out abit to get more sunlight and also I've been get lot of eggs and fluffy eggs sag thing are these butterfly and moth's eggs?
 

Attachments

AZ Orchard

Active Member
Premium Member
Feb 8, 2020
92
15
31
Arizona, USA
Climate
Arid, Desert, or Dry
The light brown mass looks like it Could be from the gypsy moth. Do you have them in Australia?
 

ClissAT

Valued Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Sep 27, 2015
1,842
906
361
Pomona, Qld
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Yep the fluffy one is moth eggs, not a problem even if they eat a few leaves.
Second one is either aphids or similar that suck the sap from new growth causing the newly forming leaves to curl. Depending on how many tips are affected, it could be a virus. If it's bad go round and cut the tips off.

Third one is an adult grub. Ones that are common in Qld on citrus are butterfly grubs. Even if they eat half the leaves it won't be detrimental to the overall health of the tree. Citrus are used to having their leave eaten, it's in their DNA.
As long as the flowers don't get eaten it's all good.
It's better to have the butterflies flitting around the garden.

It also could be a grasshopper or locust but it's long gone by now.

Re fleshy green leaves, they give off infrared signals and pheromones that attract insects. Citrus really shouldn't have that short of soft growth for optimal health. Not only does it cause soft leaves but also soft roots.