Question What is your plan for winter veg planting

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by David - coona, Feb 26, 2017.

  1. David - coona

    David - coona Active Member Premium Member

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    With the weather cooling down, the corn and tomato's starting to look a bit tatty, thoughts turn to winter veg. Firm white caulis, sweet crisp cabbage, tight tasty Brussels, broad beans, peas, turnips. The list goes on. What veg (and cultivar) are you planning/planting this winter?

    So far we have started
    cabbage - red Dutch, sweet eureka, Savoy
    Brussels - drumtight
    cauliflower - snowball
    peas - blue bantam, greenfeast
    carrot - top weight
    Swede - champion purple top
    celery - sweet and crisp
    greenhouse
    tomato - Siberian
    cucumber - lebanese

    more to follow as the weather cools some more
     
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  2. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Good post.

    I have some seeds ready to put into trays, just bought some more today.
    I'll be seed planting:
    Broccoli - Italian Sprouting
    Cauliflower - Snowball
    Kale - Curley Scarlet
    Chinese veggies, Tatsoi red and green, Red and green Bok Choy, Choy Sum
    Spinach - Ruby Red, Perpetual leaf
    Leek - Lyon Prizetaker
    Spring onion - All year
    Cabbage - Red - Ruby Ball, Green - Primo
    Carrots - have several different ones
    Peas - Sugarsnap "Sugar Ann"
    Snow peas - Melting Mammoth
    Tomatoes - several different ones
    Celery - Tall Utah
    Lettuce - several different ones
    Butternut pumpkin just re planted some seeds
    Beetroot - Detroit red, Chioggia, Golden Detroit
    Also got some herb seeds
    And will try some more capsicum

    There maybe more or different varieties oh and some spuds and the sweet potatoes will just continue where they are.

    Really looking forward to the cooler months and really get the veggies going in our sub tropical climate.

    A question for planting out seedlings can you put things closer than they say, mainly talking about broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage etc as they take up a lot of room.
     
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  3. David - coona

    David - coona Active Member Premium Member

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    We have success planting cabbage, cauliflower at 25x25 cm spacing. brussels, broccoli at 40x40 cm. this year we are trying quick cabbage amongst the slower cabbage, pull the quick's to give the slow more space.
     
  4. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Sounds like a great plan.

    Will plant seedlings a little closer then when the time comes. :)
     
  5. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Make sure you have your grub cover ready Kate!! My god they LOVE cauli and broccoli, esp if (like me) you like to have neat little rows spaced as tightly as reasonable in a little monoculture!! I've also tried growing faster crops like lettuce/rocket in crosses between the bigger winter veg. Rocket seems much more of a deterrent to the critters than spinach - which just gets decimated here (but could work as a sacrificial crop) The good thing is none of these require fertilisation unless you're hoping to harvest seed later, so you could cover them right from the start, which is what I'm going to try this season. (Seriously, I would like to think I can outsmart a moth)
     
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  6. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    ha ha, clever things.

    Yeah I'll put putting a lot under the hoop house and have plenty of net still to through over other beds. They have certainly been a pain.
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yes you can and I often do plant slightly closer than recommended.

    Sometimes I've gone really radical and sowed direct without thinning out I call it "crowd planting." :) Used mainly for salad crops and I have done beets, carrots, bok choy, etc also.

    At the moment, I'm trialling a heap of self-sown cucumbers which I have left grow out of season and not thinned out. It's a huge twisted clump of cucumber vines trying to out compete each other and starting to flower now so I'm interested to see if I can get a harvest!
    cucumbers crowded close sow.jpg

    I'm keen to get some good tomatoes this winter - about time to get serious - this will be my focus crop over the next 5 months. I'm holding back on the brassicas for now because it's too hot at our place and they'll just go to seed early.
     
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  8. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    So Mark when do your reckon you'll pop in brassicas? I'm still trying to get the timing right on a lot of these things...last year started too late, and the heads that formed got hit by the unseasonably hot/early spring we had...and went to seed without forming much of a head at all. Between that and the caterpillars, I may as well have not bothered! This year I have a cunning plan...now the brassica bed is covered with what appears to be a 4-poster bed mosquito net. It's very glamorous :)
    The frame is heavy enough to stop rats getting up under but the netting fine enough to stop most things. Just have to make sure when I'm moving it for maintenance that I don't trap things under it! I'm hoping to build another one for the bed that currently has canteloupe and cukes. They've still got maturing fruit, which I'm reluctant to waste, but have a sneaking suspicion the fruit will be tasteless anyway. Still waiting for my one remaining mango to ripen!
     
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  9. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I have no plans for winter veg this year.
    My shire & that north of me was drought declared today.
    We had a nice little storm yesterday yielding 18ml but the runoff didn't make it to the dam.
    The flower garden & orchard got a nice watering which will help a lot but within a few days it will all be gone.
    The rain did not soak into the ground more than 1.5cm.
    Very disappointing but nice to get non-the-less.
    I have bought an heirloom bullocks heart tomato seedling, a black zucchini & a Lebanese cucumber to grow on the verandah where I can better control the possums, crows & rats.
    Other than that I doubt I will have any winter crops.
     
  10. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I reckon late autumn is best for brassicas and traditional salad crops in the subtropics.

    In southeast Queensland, planting in May gives broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, etc 3 months maturing at the end of winter into first month of spring before the moths and butterflies hit again in force.

    For example, last year I planted my brukale too late and it matured towards the end of spring by this time the cabbage moths decimated it but my cabbage, cauliflower, and kale matured several months earlier and was hardly touched by pests.

    I rarely have a problem with pests in the patch unless I stuff up and plant out of season... :rolleyes:
     
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  11. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hehehe point taken!
     
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