What do yall grow during summer?

Discussion in 'Subtropical Climate Only' started by Tonytony, Feb 17, 2020.

  1. Tonytony

    Tonytony Member Premium Member

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    This year I'm trying to have food year round, but I'm out of ideas as to what to plant during the texas summers. I have a couple ideas but I'm not sure what things can survive those humid, 100f+ months. What kind of things are a good idea to grow/try out?
     
  2. Tash Hender

    Tash Hender Member Premium Member

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    Hi,

    I have just moved to a sub-tropical area (Brisbane AUS) so would love to know this too.
    In January I planted lots of things, but only a few things grew. I'm not sure if the ants "stole" my seeds or if some heavy rain washed them away. My cucumbers are loving life, and all my beans shot up but the last couple of days have not gone so well. An I have 1 corn plant that's growing really well, I did have 2 but my dog jumped onto the garden and squashed one and it never recovered. Next year before it gets hot, I'm going to try planting some taller veggies like corn or even some capsicum, I am hoping this will shade and shelter the smaller plants underneath. Not sure how it will go but thought its worth a shot.

    Happy gardening
    Tash
     
  3. Chris4066

    Chris4066 Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I successfully germinated and grew perpetual spinach, tomato and summer squash seedlings over summer, but in seed trays inside my apartment. I've now transplanted the spinach (it's tough as nails - Mark is dead right - everyone should grow this stuff) and squash into planters on my balcony. The seedlings got pretty leggy, though, likely because I chickened out of giving them the recommended amount of full sun, due to the heat. Maybe I was being too careful, but they're still alive and seem to be doing okay, albeit a little underdeveloped. Next year I might try grow lights.

    I am following the gardenate guidelines for Australia - subtropical. March will be bok choy and cabbage for me (hopefully it will cool down in the next two weeks).

    If it's any consolation, my father's entire vegetable garden was wiped out in the rains the other week.
     
  4. KangaBanga

    KangaBanga Member Premium Member GOLD

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    You can try planting passionfruit end of winter/early spring and by summer you will have fruit all season long. Minimal care and loves hot humid weather. For veges try red amaranth, malabar spinach, sweet potato leaves and lady fingers(okra). All are humid heat loving plants which need minimal care other than watering and spread like weeds. Of course lots of chillis too!

    Red amaranth
    [​IMG]
     
  5. KangaBanga

    KangaBanga Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi i am in brisbane too. Use shade cloth if you finding your plants getting burnt. Taller veggies will not shade or shelter smaller plants, especially during the super hot overhead arvo sun, unless you plant under a tree shade its not gonna work. Try starting your seeds in a seed tray then transplant.
     
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  6. Jo M

    Jo M Member Premium Member

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    I have found that most Mature plants can do okay in the heat if they stay watered many of them (not all) may slow production until it cools but will produce again when it cools. Young or unhealthy plants usually in my experience will not make it through the Hottest months. If you are using containers you can move them to a shadier part of your yard for summer, but in my experience my summer shaded garden they grew well and drooped less, however they did not produce any fruits (or vegetables ) for lack of sunlight.

    I would also add Okra, Pinto Beans and many herbs to the heat loving plants.

    Good Gardening everyone :goodluck:
     
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  7. Mary Playford

    Mary Playford Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Tonytony

    Pumpkins, watermelons, sweet potatoes' red cabbage...
     
  8. Mary Playford

    Mary Playford Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    KangaBanga

    I am going to plant some of my tomatoes under my fruit trees next season. The shade cloth is a good idea, I am thinking of doing that too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2020
  9. KangaBanga

    KangaBanga Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yep if planting under fruit trees u can either do pots or mound up the area under the tree so your veges roots "live" in the top layer without affecting the tree roots.
     
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