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Featured Upcycled Esky Wormfarm

Discussion in 'Building DIY, Machinery & Tools' started by Fergzter, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi all,

    Just wanted to share my worm farm, made from and old esky that was sadly broken a few years ago. As I was generating more green waste that my worms and compost containers could handle I decided to increase my worm farm capacity by using this old esky and a few scrap materials from my garden.

    I set it up next to my old worm farm, in a shady spot at the back of our block.

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, the esky has seen better days

    [​IMG]

    I levelled the esky on top of a few old milk crates. It does have a slight slope to the hole. I made sure to flood test, then dribble test to make sure that the worm tea will end up in the bucket

    Flood Test:

    [​IMG]

    Dribble Test:

    [​IMG]

    I added in some old garden stakes and then some seed trays (forgot to photograph that sorry) to allow free drainage and air flow.

    [​IMG]

    I had some very old and dead shadecloth left by the last owner that I used as a filter layer.

    Apologies about sideways picture

    [​IMG]

    I added some shredded paper and watered to make damp.

    [​IMG]

    Then a few shovels of compot and manure mix (home grown of course)

    [​IMG]

    Convinced some worms to move into the new worm farm from the old worm farm

    [​IMG]

    Added a layer of cardboard to make the space dark for the worms as I am fresh out of heshion sacks at the moment.

    [​IMG]

    Added the old broken lid back on the top. I left the clips up, to allow about 5mm breathing gap at the top of the esky. I can close this down if I find things dry out too much.

    [​IMG]

    All in all it took about 45 minutes to make... mostly delayed by going to wash my hands to take photos.

    I will hold off adding fresh food for the worms for about a week until they are settled. Then I will post more updates as things progress.

    As always, happy for feedback on improvements.

    Best thing about this little project was that everything was recycled or reclaimed. Cost $0
     

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    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
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  2. GKW

    GKW Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    That deserves a "like", an "informative" and DIY star!

    Well done!:twothumbsup:
     
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  3. Cheryl Smyth

    Cheryl Smyth Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Wonderful job! I believe that will be better than store bought for many reasons. First and most important to me. Those trays can become to heavy to lift after filed with castings!!! I have to wait for a man to come by and remember to ask him to lift tray for emptying and they have a little of a struggle themselves. Again beautiful job thinking of recycling your cooler ( what we call it in the United States). Worm composting is my favorite composting. Every one waste food that could be composted!
    Composting is the Heartbeat Of Organic Gardening
     
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  4. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Credit to Costa. It is pretty much his video that I based mine off.

     
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  5. Burga

    Burga Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Awesome job. Thanks for sharing. :thumbsup:

    Now to go search the shed for a broken esky. :)
     
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  6. Jake Monteleone

    Jake Monteleone Member Premium Member GOLD

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  7. Jake Monteleone

    Jake Monteleone Member Premium Member GOLD

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    good job and hope it gos well for you
     
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  8. Cheryl Smyth

    Cheryl Smyth Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks for sharing :chuffed:
    I believe Australia is ahead of United States when it comes to worm composting . I like the cooler idea easier to attain already has lid ,hole for drainage and insulated . Plus you recycled :cheer:Couldn’t get better!
     
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  9. William Welch

    William Welch Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Well done indeed! I have a few old coolers that I will try this in. Thanks
     
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  10. Gaz

    Gaz Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Good job, I haven’t had a worm farm for a while but, this has inspired me to give it a go again when I return home from work in a couple of weeks.
     
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  11. Jake Monteleone

    Jake Monteleone Member Premium Member GOLD

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    thanks for videos cheryl
    cheers Jake
     
  12. Karla

    Karla Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    What do you do with them in winter?
     
  13. Cheryl Smyth

    Cheryl Smyth Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I have worms in laundry room and outside. I live in Louisiana so not to many freezing weather and they do just fine. Cover with shedded leaves , compost, or cardboard. Feed heavy. Been worm composting over a decade.
    Composting is the heartbeat of organic gardening
     
  14. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    For our climate we can let them stay outside. While we do get cold, its not like it is snow on the ground type cold. Our worm farms do slow right down over winter however. Thus making a second one to get us through those slow times.

    I hear people in the UK bring them inside, or into the garage over winter.
     
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  15. Jake Monteleone

    Jake Monteleone Member Premium Member GOLD

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    i believe you because i have a worm farm and they are hard to look . after but mine are going really well Cheryl
    Cheers Jake
     
  16. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Turning the Esky into a worm farm is a really logical method of upcycling, congrats!:thumbsup:

    When it comes time to harvest some compost out of the farm there are a few ways to encourage the worms to vacate your chosen handfuls.
    One is to add a handful of bran to one far corner which draws all the worms over to there.
    Second method is to expose half the compost by pulling all the course material to one end. Then also leave the lid off which lets light in. The worms head for the darker end within minutes leaving your chosen section free of worms.

    However, remember to have enough new material to go in after you harvest compost so they don't get overcrowded or they will climb out!
     

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