Tropical Peach low chill variety growing well!

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Mark, Nov 6, 2014.

  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I'm very impressed with our tropical peach this season. The fruit isn't huge but it's as tasty as any peach I can remember from my childhood as long as they are left to fully ripen on the tree if they are picked early to ripen inside (like to avoid fruit fly strike) then they can be quite bland. This tree is only a few years old and at about 5 feet high but we've got about 25 peaches of it this year.

    We have several low chill stone fruits growing in our front yard replacing ornamentals and it surprises me how well they fruit! The odd peach does get hit by fruit fly and raided by a possum or bird but in the main most fruit is perfect. Still, when the tree gets bigger and so to the harvests, I'll probably have to net it.

    I mulch it with leaves from the big lily pily in our front yard and sprinkle a little quail and chook manure around the base - sometimes blood & bone, and it seems to keep the tree happy. It's quite drought resistant and even though a tropical variety the tree still sheds its leaves through winter.

    The flowers are pretty and all up a tropical peach tree is a no fuss, good fruiting, productive food plant to grow in the home garden.

    There's nothing like a peach straight off the tree - how magic is that :chuffed:

    tropical peach low chill picked off tree.jpg

    tropical peach low chill picked off tree bite taken.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Love it! Love it! x 1
  2. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2015
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    Preston, QLD
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Joining you in this venture, Mark.
    I have a few to plant in over the weekend as well as plums and hope that they'll look and taste as good as yours in a couple of years' time.
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    My bet is yours will out do mine mainly because Toowoomba has a better climate with a lower and longer chill period. Best of luck with them!

    Were your stone fruit trees bare rooted?
     
  4. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2015
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    Preston, QLD
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    No, I got them all through local market vendors who get them in potted from surrounding nurseries.
    So I expect they'll take a little while to catch on after planting. I hope to get time enough to give them the TLC they need to thrive.
    The cooler weather might help with getting the more high chill varieties going, but for now I'm sticking to the lower chill cultivars of nectarines, plums and peaches.
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Yeah sticking with the low chill varieties is a safe bet.
     
  6. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2015
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    Preston, QLD
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    I'm trying a peacherine tomorrow and a peachacot in spring, hoping they too will give me some love.
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I haven't tried either of those cross varieties it'll be interesting to see what you think of them.
     
  8. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2015
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    Preston, QLD
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Will let you know as they develop.
     
  9. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    SE Queensland, Australia
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    How are is the peach tree going Mark, it's not been updated for a while. I can't eat stone fruit from the shops as it's sprayed with pesticide. So I haven't had a stone fruit a apart from tinned in 10 years. Used to love nectarines.

    What stone fruit are you growing successfully? that are any good?
     
  10. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Well they're dormant at the moment Kate but the peach is still growing nicely. I'll do some pruning this winter on all the stone fruit and tidy the trees up a bit.

    All low chill varieties we have peaches including the flat variety, nectarines, plum (Gulf Gold) it's a big producer. Netting is essential against fruit fly and animals - that's the only pain - everything seems to love stone fruit!
     
  11. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    SE Queensland, Australia
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Just bought one from Daley's :) they have 3 left.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    SE Queensland, Australia
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Mark which flat peach do you have? China Flat or Angle subtropical? You never said in your video.
     
  13. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Ahh sorry, yes Angle subtropical :)
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  14. Scrambled

    Scrambled Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Tweed Heads, NSW
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I planted one of these flat peaches about 4 years ago, apparently a low chill variety. It is very healthy, but every year it sets a lot of fruit, which then all drops off while still quite small. Anyone else had this problem? I'm thinking either water stress or poor pollination. Discovered them while travelling in Europe and they were soooo tasty!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Yes, the fruit will drop due to lack of water but they could also be getting stung by bugs like citrus bug/stink bugs or fruit fly - this will cause the fruit to drop prematurely.

    As soon as the tree is finished flowering try netting and see if that helps the problem.
     
  16. Scrambled

    Scrambled Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Tweed Heads, NSW
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Thanks Mark, I'll give that a go next season.
     
  17. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    564
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I agree with Mark re uneven watering causing fruit fall.
    But sometimes lack of fertilizer can do it too.

    What is your fertilizing strategy?
    Commercial fruit tree fertilizer like yates will provide good nutrition, particularly the extra potassium needed to sustain fruit.
    Or if you use more natural fertilizer, be sure to add enough potassium suphate in with the blood and bone.
    10% by weight in the b&b. Apply b&b at rate of 1 adult handful per tree per year of age up to 5handfuls max.
    The downside of applying b&b in the dry season is it attracts ants, rodents, other digging critters, unless well dug in then watered in and heavily mulched.
     
Loading...

Share This Page