Spring Summer Veg Container Garden

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by ClissAT, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    With a goodly amount of rain water at my disposal this year, complements of my new shed, I have been able to apply enough quality water to grow some decent fruit and veg.
    Such a luxury for me to grow salad greens in the dry season!
    In previous years I used grey water with mixed results, but nothing as good as this year's crop.

    However I wish I could impart similar good news for my computer! That computer tech guy has a lot to answer for! Getting these photos through the whole process has taken all morning and until now 2pm!
    First I use my Sony camera to take good photos which I can still load onto my pc. But then the dancing starts. With no internet connectivity and no photo editing or library software on the pc now, I use windows to load them, but then have to deal with each individually. (So best not to take too many!) They are then bluetoothed to the tablet which only has basic android photo editing apps because I'm a tighta$$ & don't want to pay for apps. :rolleyes:
    So they go through one app called Reduce Photo Size from over 5000kb down to a workable 250-300 kb, shared on to Snapseed for colour and crop editing and txt writing, then maybe the tablet will acknowledge the save. If not, I email the photo to myself and download back into the gallery!

    So after all of that palarva, here are today's offerings.:D

    My Roundabout Garden is so lush this year from the new water. With all the flashy spring blooms, it's hard to see the containers of veg over the back.
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    It was so hot this morning, plants were already wilting at 10am.
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    The small flowerets that come after the main head are such a bonus.
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    The large shrubs behind the veg containers are also getting a good drink courtesy of the overflow so they keep reaching into places they shouldn't go! I go through every week and prune them back but on these extremely hot windy days the added protection has been welcome.
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    The young plants are still growing very well so the overhanging branches can't be all bad.
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    These sugarloaf cabbages have been slow to grow from winter but now heading up nicely. Bring on coleslaw!
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    The berries are a bit of a test run. I got bare rooted plants autumn 2017 and planted them in 2gal buckets while the berry grove was built. Well the berry grove is still a work in progress but the berries are liking life in the buckets! I have them stashed in under a pigeon pea and a durranta where they can stick their canes out into the light. I've got quite a reasonable crop. So far (fingers crossed) the parrots haven't found them. Its a bit squeezy for parrots where I've put them so hoping that does the trick so I get the fruit first. :idea:
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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Too much to expect all to go smoothly! 2 photos failed to make the expedition so I had to take them through again.

    This photo shows the majority of what I planted this year. This row is 5 containers long so plants aren't quite as crowded in as they may appear here.
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    Saving seed is always high on the list for me. So easy to just grab a seedhead and sprinkle it around. There is rocket in every garden on this property now along with basil, purple mustard, tomatoes various, various lettuce types, pumpkins and others I can't remember now.
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    When I say 'every garden', I mean:- old original soil vegetable garden, bathtub beds, food forest, roundabout garden, wild critter food plantings, orchard, granny flat garden, ummm I think there's more but thats enough for now! :p

    Also this morning I potted on some Green Zebra tomatoes I saved off the rejects rack at Bunnings on Saturday. Its stupid how they sew seed into little pots these days. There were 9 plants all filling the space of one seed. I soaked them in mild seaweed solution overnight then prized their roots apart. The 2 strongest plants I planted out straight away into a container near the beetroots. The remainder I've potted up to grow on for a couple weeks. Then some can go into the new ground of the food forest near the shed where the top soil from the excavation went. Being only watered with rain water now, they should do ok in the soil.
    The others will fill spaces in various containers around the place or into the bathtub beds. The cherry toms have produced amazingly well but are halfway through their life now so the green zebras will be starting just in time. :twothumbsup:

    These days I've simplified my potting mix for growing all sorts of things.
    I still make it by the barrow load and usually at least one load per week.
    There's a lot of coir being used here now. I've worked out a way to get the help of the bandicoots to turn the wetted xoir into the ground under whatever plants I'm hoping to help. Also by watering a patch of ground, then topping with coir and some mulch, the bandicoots come along and dig it all in for me! :idea: Such generous critters. :cool:

    So the potting mix recipe is 10scoops of Searles Premium potting mix with 12 mths fertilizer in it; 10 scoops of well soaked coir; 2scoops of chicken manure pellets; 3scoops perlite. This all mixes very easily in the barrow and is light enough for me to carry in a pot. When I pot or plant a plant I add a teaspoon of Powerfeed prilled fertilizer. Supposedly still certified organic but easier to apply than the liquid.
    This potting mix recipe holds a good amount of moisture so long as I cover with a thick layer of mulch. I'm working my way through a truck load of coconut tree trunk mulch that was ground up by one of those huge mulching machines. Its excellent mulch remaining soft and moist right through the profile. It also helps to make an excellent transition layer where it sits on the soil. I'm finding many plants are just putting roots into the mulch, not bothering to root into the hard soil. So long as I can keep the mulch moist all will be good.;)
     
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  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Something I find myself now doing is to apply a little gypsum or dolomite at certain times of the year.
    The bananas love a little but because they prefer a slightly acidic soil, I need to come along after a few weeks and sprinkle a bit of iron sulphate which until recently I would not have done here. There is already so much iron in the soil and dam water but now using only rain water, the plants need that bit.

    I even put the tiniest bit of dolomite around brassicas and cues in the containers. It certainly helped my snow peas earlier this year.

    My soil and potting mix both seem to be a bit alkaline but still, the addition of just a little of those types of lime does help.

    Most of my older pots, the older soil vegie beds, orchard, bathtub beds and roundabout garden containers that still hold some old potting mix were watered with the toxic dam water during the dry seasons until mid 2017, so there will be a transition period to re-establish good micro biome. However, looking at how well all my gardens are doing right now, one would never think there had been such a dramatic problem with the water. I do still hold hope to fix that terrible dam water one day! But until then, there is no way to grow commercial crops here unfortunately.
     
  4. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Goodness still having computer issues. Good you have found a work around though :) and everything is looking great. I'm not doing much at all in the garden due to some sinuses issues and my hubby has been very sick for the last few months, so it's a matter of keeping alive what I have.
     
  5. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Kate I do hope all gets much better for you sooner.
    I also hope this terrible weather isn't taking too much toll on your garden.
     
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