So why can't I grow celery?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Director, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Here's a pic of my celery effort, these were planted last year, I had the same results with another lot that I planted as well. Nice and green and bushi but not much stem growth.

    [​IMG]

    Any ideas? One possibility is that the insect netting I use is blocking too much sunlight (though it's not supposed to). Other than that I have no idea.

    Thanks
     
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  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I don't find celery the easiest plant to grow either to be honest. It needs a pretty long season to get to maturity also, which can be tricky to time where I am due to the heat and shortish cool season.

    The image is showing a definite nitrogen shortage though... I would give it a good liquid fertiliser feed (with a another in a few weeks) to see if there's any improvement and make sure the plants are spaced so they all get good light. I'm not sure if the shade cloth would be blocking out too much - maybe?

    P.S It is actually proper celery and not that bush celery grown for leaves - just checking :)
     
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  3. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Good question. I'll check better myself next time too. :)

    I wasn't aware there was a difference.
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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  5. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Yeah, nah, pretty sure one lot was the 'Tall Utah' from these guys:

    http://greenharvest.com.au/SeedOrganic/VegetableSeeds/CeleryToChilli.html

    And the second lot was from Bunnings. I only grow them for juicing really so it's not a HUGE issue, be nice to figure it out though. Rather not buy them from the shops as they are one of the 'deadly dozen' in terms of pesticides and chemicals...apparently.
     
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  6. Ann

    Ann Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi,
    I grew celery years ago in Oregon. If I remember correctly :) I believe it needs to be blanched. Like you do with endive. I think I piled dirt up around the base of the plant. It does love a cool climate also. Good luck. Ann
     
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  7. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Thanks Ann. :)
     
  8. Ken W.

    Ken W. Active Member Premium Member

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    Celery needs a mild to cold climate and daily watering.
     
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  9. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Thanks Ken....that'll explain it. :)
     
  10. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I know this is an old thread but had to comment. I used to live down the road from a commercial celery farm. The celery they grew was the most delicious you have ever eaten in your life. But, isn't there always a but. It was grown in the most chemical way possible Seedlings were planted out & then tons of fertilizer & gallons of water was poured on. The plants grew so fast you could almost see it happening. That is the trick to growing celery that is tall juicy not stringy. It was blanched by using sheets of corrugated iron. It took only about 8 weeks from planting to harvest. Side effect of all the chemical fertiliser was the run offwent into our creek & I kid you not the water cress that grew in the creek was over 6 feet tall with stalks that were 4 inches in diameter but had no inside they were just a ring of stalk empty in the middle. The farmer also dusted with a copper dust every Thursday because it was Thursday. That was for sooty mould & other fungal things. The celery I grew down the road with horse manure was stringy & tended to be bitter. Oh well.
     
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  11. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    That was an interesting story @Flatland and there's no doubt farming like you describe does work but my "but" is I would argue celery and salad crops in general are exceptions because imho most other "fast grown" crops lack taste.

    For example, fruits like strawberries and tomatoes commercially grown may look nice but they taste like water... :)
     
  12. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I would normally agree many a time I've had huge strawberries that look beautiful & taste like nothing but I have to admit that C's celery was the tastiest I've ever eaten. The gods only know what he put on it.
     
  13. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I have to agree with you actually... I've never grown great celery myself.

    Commercial strawberry season is over in SEQ but our plants are just starting to hit peak production and they taste amazing - no exaggeration.
     
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