My small urban garden

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Jenny, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Been having lots of rain since last weekend, which is a very welcome, since we have had repeated heatwaves since beginning September & the country is experiencing a drought.

    On my patio I am currently using an old wheelie bin with a missing wheel, propped up on bricks, as a makeshift rain barrel (it holds about 240 litres) and it has filled up twice since the rains started - I empty the water into buckets when it gets full, so that it can fill up again. I plan on buying a few more wheelie bins this year and then I'm going to place them next to each other and connect them with pvc pipes, so that I will have multiple "rain bins". It will work out much cheaper that buying proper rain barrels.

    Unfortunately on New Years eve, the heavy rains caused a massive tree on the pavement outside my house to topple over from the base of the trunk at ground level. The uprooted tree fell over my gate, damaged my gate and palisade, tree branches damaged my son's car and the top of the tree ended up on my patio, covering most of my patio. Thankfully the gate supported the toppled tree, else damage would have been far worse and cars would have been completely crushed.

    Miraculously most of my plants on my patio survived, but my prickly pear grown from seed lost 2 pads, some pads were damaged on the other prickly pears as well, but at least it did not break off completely. I'm waiting for the broken off pads to callous over, then I'm going to plant it in a pot so it can root. My goji berry plant, lemon trees & satsuma trees lost some branches and my pumpkins growing in the alleyway up the trellis, ended up loosing medium sized pumpkins at the top of the trellis. Shame and the tall agave flower stalk with its beautiful yellow flowers is no more, the falling tree broke it right off. :(

    On a more positive note, plants in alleyway are growing nicely - quite a few turnips and gem squash ready for harvest & yellow and black mustard plants are in flower. On the patio the chilli peppers, tomatoes, herbs, fruits and everything else is growing nicely . I'm letting the mints and basils go to seed, so I can save some seed.
    The water spinach (kangkong) grown from seed in September, is getting bigger (last year I ended up killing my seedlings) and I planted out sweet potato slips in a bed in the alley way as well. - will post pictures in a few days time.:)
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2019
  2. Tony Baker

    Tony Baker Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Jenny have a look at getting an ICB tank (Food grade). Holds 1000lt and only takes up 1 sqm of space.
     
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  3. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    That is a great idea Tony. Pricing wise they are more expensive than wheelie bins , but hold more water, so definitely something to consider.

    I've actually been toying with the idea for a few years now, to try my hand at aquaponics (I like the idea of having fresh fish on hand) and using ICB tanks for that, but alas so far I have been unable to convince hubby to let me dabble in that, ditto when it comes to chickens (purely for eggs) and beekeeping...doesn't want me to turn our urban property into a mini-farm:(. Guess I can't blame him, cause knowing myself, if I am given free reign, I will most probably have a cow crazing in the front yard, so I can have fresh milk!:ROFL:
     
  4. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Took a few photos today of my plants in the mint family & included the vics plant and lemon verbena. I planted korean mint and bergamot seed and one of them germinated, not sure which. Forgot to add a pic of my Nepeta Mussinii to this mint collage, but I have already posted a pic of that before on this thread. mintfamilyplantpics2019.jpg

    And here are some random images taken today: randompics2019.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  5. Tony Baker

    Tony Baker Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Just start making it. Its easier to ask for forgiveness than permission;).
     
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  6. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Lol very true. I've had my eye on the ready made complete set up on this website (a bit pricey though but it has everything I will need to get started): http://www.flowbins.co.za/?page_id=42
     
  7. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    On another note, yesterday I harvested a couple of gem squashes and some turnips from my alleyway garden & I noticed that some of the pumpkins that has formed on the ground as well as on the trellises, are getting black mold and kinda shriveling up, whilst the small newly formed pumpkins are yellowing & shriveling up - last week these pumpkins were still healthy and growing nicely.

    Guess this mold is caused by all the rain we have had since last week. The soil is drenched & more rain is coming today. I welcome the rain as the country needs it, but disappointed that I'm loosing my pumpkins as a result. Thankfully there are still lots of flowers on the vines, so hopefully I will get more pumpkins once things dry up again.

    Here is a pic I took now:
    pumpkinmold.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  8. Tony Baker

    Tony Baker Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Try some sugar cane mulch under them. It'll keep them off the soil.
     
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  9. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Some pics of my curry plants & also my lovage which is growing in a tyre.

    The curry bush is a great perennial plant. When you wet the leaves with water, the aroma of curry fills the air. It is very easily propagated from cuttings.

    The curry trees have gone to seed, so once the seed berries are ripe (they turn a purplish black color), I will be planting them. It is a perennial as well. Last summer I planted a few seeds, but the seedlings died, so going to try my hand at it again this year. The tree can also be propagated from cuttings - I tried it once, but was not successful.

    Lovage is one of my fav herbs, I harvested a lot of leaves recently for drying, so in the pic below the plants are much shorter than before harvest.

    curryplants and lovage.jpg
     
  10. Jenny

    Jenny Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Great idea, thank you. Can't understand why the pumpkins on the trellis got moldy also, as it was not touching the ground and the plants itself do not have mold on them, the leaves and stems look healthy still.
     
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