Mango fruit don't taste like they used to

Discussion in 'Member's Articles & Videos' started by Mark, Feb 4, 2017.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Here's a video about my thoughts on why fruit doesn't taste as good as it used to with mangoes as the main example.

     
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  2. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Home grown Mango always tastes the best :)
     
  3. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks Mark! Sharing your thoughts inspires us to grow things for ourselves.
     
  4. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    How long do these things take to ripen??!?! My little mango has been in the ground for 2 years (it's a dwarf variety) and the first year i cut off the flowers to try to encourage it to grow rather than expend energy in fruit. Last spring, it flowered REALLY early but they all died off with the weird weather. I pruned off the flowering growth and was surprised it flowered again quite late in the season. I left it with 2 fruit (because I'm impatient, even though I knew I probably should give it a few more seasons of growth first). Both grew to full size. I got so paranoid that the critters would get the mangos I picked one while green (having read somewhere it would ripen inside...it didn't) - the other is still on the tree. It's at least 12-15cm long and a "Palmer" variety (allegedly suitable for Brisbane weather). But apart from a very mild blush of pink there's been no further growth, and no sign of ripening. I'm thinking about eating a bunch of bananas and hanging that all over the tree! (except that'd probably be abn open invite to fruit fly, which don't seem to have found the garden yet). Could I be missing some nutrient? (I fertilise it with fruit fertiliser, as well as organis compost etc etc) Or am I just not being patient enough?
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    No I doubt it - you're doing everything right from what I can tell.

    Mangoes do indeed ripen if picked green as long as they are not picked too early. A blush on the skin is a good sign also a thickening/rounding of the nose or point of the fruit usually means it can be picked.

    Picking mangoes too early can result in fruit not ripening at all and the fruit wrinkling up. Picking mangoes close to maturity but not past the "point" can result in the fruit ripening poorly with an immature taste - inexperienced mango farmers are often guilty of this in the rush to get fruit to market. The DPI in QLD specifically warns mango growers about picking fruit too early as a way to cheat the public.

    Ripening the mango on the tree until blushed and the flesh gives slightly is the best but it is also risky due to insect and animal damage (unless the fruit is netted).

    Selecting the mango at a mature stage but still green is what most backyard growers do.

    http://www.selfsufficientme.com/fru...-mango-is-ripe-or-ready-to-pick-from-the-tree
     
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