Featured Macro - Discussion & Photos

Discussion in 'Photography & Technology' started by stevo, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    I liked this one because of the bright light and sharpness. Blue Banded Bees are always hard to capture because they never stay still

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    Five Eyes... Notice the three eyes on top of the head. They are called simple eyes or ocelli. They don’t see images but detect light…

    Species - Stingless Bees - Tetragonula Carbonaria

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    Also seen here with the Solitary Bee - Fire Tailed Resin Bee
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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    As always, Stevo, I find your photos to be stupefyingly beautiful!

    I saw an iridescent blue (or green) native bee (or was it a wasp?) in real life in my house yesterday & was struck by how tiny it was compared to your large monitor sized photo. :thumbsup:
     
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  3. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    cheers Clissa. You need to go bee chasing in your garden with the camera! :pic:.. well, I usually just grab a coffee and sit and wait and watch. :cheers:
     
  4. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    Blue Banded Bees. The males roost on thin twigs at night.

    I saw these two setting themselves up in the afternoon on this twig. This is inside my chicken coop, so I went in there about an hour ago with the camera and grabbed a few shots. I had the camera set up on the tripod, and used a torch to shine on the bees and get the focus.

    The depth of field is quiet shallow, a fraction of a millimetre, so I focused on the eyes to get the detailed eye pattern. You can see the outer eye is in focus but then the mandibles are out of focus, that would be a fraction of a millimetre difference in distance. The closer you get the shallower the depth of field (along with aperture) so it's quite a challenging type of photography

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  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    You're really getting quite amazing @stevo at taking these macro shots - this section is starting to look like National Geographic!
     
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