Large Tahitian Lime Tree always in fruit and a top fruit tree

Mark

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My Tahitian Lime tree has to be one of the most valuable fruit trees in my garden and I would recommend this variety to anyone.

Check out the size of this tree! I give it an annual prune but mostly just thin out some crossing branches and try to keep any low branches off the ground. Once a year, I will give it a feed with a citrus fertiliser and occasionally throw some chicken or quail mulch/manure mix from the pens under the tree. Apart from that I don't do much else except eat the fruit (and give lots away).

This tree is rarely without a lime to pick, actually, I can't recall a time in the past 3 years when it hasn't had fruit. ATM it has all cycles, mature fruit, maturing fruit, small fruit, and flowers.

I have a friend who lives in Brisbane and he sometimes pays up to $2 per lime from his local store so whenever we visit I take a bag :)

I have placed a 1.8 metre post in front of the tree as an indication to show its size - it's massive!

As most people know, limes are great for a whole range of uses particularly cooking, and drinks like a Vodka'n lime or in an ice cold Corona :cheers:

tahitian lime tree large.jpg
 

stevo

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hrm, I have one too, it's about about 1m tall and is looking healthy. When you crush the leaves in your hand they smell great. I think mine is a dwarf type, I hoep it doesn't get as big as yours anyway!
 

Mark

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hrm, I have one too, it's about about 1m tall and is looking healthy. When you crush the leaves in your hand they smell great. I think mine is a dwarf type, I hoep it doesn't get as big as yours anyway!
Yeah, mowing around the tree on my ride-on you can smell the lime - bloody wonderful.
 

Mark

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How do you get to the fruit at the top of the tree Mark?
A ladder or by pulling a branch down citrus are very flexible.
Would pruning the tree help?
Yes it would... but citrus don't get very big anyway. Although, a good prune each season after fruiting helps to keep the tree aired out.

I've run into a nasty problem with this tree and several other trees called citrus borer - I'm trying to eradicate it organically atm but it's making a mess of my trees and makes pruning mandatory big time!
 

Steve

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I've got one of these Lime trees too. Your's is beautiful and lush there Mark, nice work.
Mine is still a baby and is in a large pot.
My last one was also in a pot and did well for a while. For a small tree it gave us a decent amount of fruit but it got smashed in a storm and it never really recovered. I felt i was best getting a new one and starting from scratch. It's definitely on my list for my orchid once I get to that.

And yes it kills me to be paying for limes. On a walk a few months ago I noticed a tree in someones front yard that was about the same size as yours Mark and laden with fruit. I pinched a couple cos it was dark at the time (yes I'm a criminal and feel bad about it) but I should go back and ask the owner if they would mind me grabbing a few from time to time. I'm sure they would be fine with it but its always nice to ask.
 

pauln

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Borer and gal wasp are two annoying pests to look out for on citrus.
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to get rid of citrus borer other than poking around in the holes with wire in the hope of skewering them?
I've skewered 2 so far but there is at least one other one in the trunk of the tree....makes a real mess of the tree doing lots of damage...
Help!!
 

Tony Baker

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My lime was planed on a mound of spoil from our shed build. Its going great guns but this year I haven't been able to keep the water up to it so it hasn't produced a lot.
 

ClissAT

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Don't worry Tony, everything needs a holiday at some point.
Drought is nature's way of giving things a holiday.
If the plant or animal is healthy and the land not overgrazed or overcropped it will recover.

Something you could do is dig into the mound a couple of large blocks of soaked coconut coir. Soak them one at a time in a wheelbarrow. It will help immensely in future with moisture holding without causing wet feet.