Kombucha & fermenting

Discussion in 'Food - Cooking, Preserving & Fermentation' started by AndrewB, Sep 18, 2018.

  1. AndrewB

    AndrewB Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi all,

    I decided to put the prize from winning the monthly competition (Thanks again Mark) towards a 9 Liter Kombucha urn & a Fermenting kit. It's something I've been wanting to try for some time, so I'm looking forward to experimenting & sharing the results here.
     
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  2. AndrewB

    AndrewB Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Kombucha is up & running & I just finished filling my first jar of a sort of Kimchi.

    I was surprised at how much you can pack in there. I'll need to up my cabbage production I think.

    I based it around a recipe in 'Fermented vegetables', which is a pretty good book on the subject of fermenting. But just used what I had on hand in the garden.

    1 Chinese cabbage
    3 Carrots
    a big chunk of Ginger
    A couple of cloves of garlic
    1 dozen dried red chilies
    2 tablespoons of salt

    It smells fantastic, I had to resist just eating it as it was!

    For the Kombucha, I think I would have been better to just buy another big water filter from bunnings rather than the little urn. They are Australian made, so I wanted to support local, but the quality isn't great. The tap leaked like a sieve. The seals were rock hard & poor quality, so were never going to work. I had to make a trip to bunnings to pick up a new tap, which works great.

    kombucha.jpg
    mix.jpg
    ferment.jpg
     
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  3. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I love these vegetable mixes for ferments they are really interesting and almost always turn out tasty.

    Did you make a brine first with your two tablespoons of salt or did you add the salt to the veggies and pour in the water?

    I'm interested to know because generally, I use a tad under 1 x tablespoon per cup of water already dissolved in water to make the brine and then pour it over and this usually works out well although in the past I have had some ferments that either go putrid or remain too salty and I think this has a lot to do with the type and how strong the bacteria are at the beginning of the process rather than being a tad under or over salted.

    Anyway, good luck with yours!
     
  4. AndrewB

    AndrewB Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    The 25 grams/2 teaspoons of salt per cabbage seems to be working well for me. I do not add any water at all, it all comes from the cabbage.

    I salt the cabbage & other ingredients in a giant stainless steel bowl & give it a good mix by hand, then 5 minutes of smashing with a wooden stomper to let the salt start to do its thing. I leave it for 30 minutes, then give it another stir & smash.

    At this point the cabbage should be fairly limp & have plenty of juices in the bottom of the bowl. If so, then its ready to pack into the jar. I pack it in really tight with the stomper, add the juice if required (just enough to cover the vegetables), leaving about 1-2" free space in the top & put the lid on.

    I've been leaving them out for 5-7 days, then putting them in the fridge to eat.
     
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  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    That's how I make sauerkraut.

    I bet that fermented juice tastes great then... and would be fantastic for gut health!
     
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