Just Peppers

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Bea, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member

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    Lots of sweet and hot peppers growing - bushes or seedlings. This is the start of the rainy season so I really MUST get more plastic to drape over the frame that covers the sweet peppers. Otherwise, they become water logged - the only way to describe this phenomenon. The hot peppers seem to do well out in the open. Go figure.
    The biggest problem I have right now is the habanero. The bush is maybe three years old with a height of 3' and spread of about two '. It is cut back maybe once a year, and continues to produce loads of flowers followed by green fruit. The problem is that the fruit drops before it ripens and they are now quite small. I had success two years ago and managed a jar full of dried red peppers but I am down to one! last year I picked one red pepper near the end of the rainy season.
    I also have three plants called Italian Long Hots from a new seed packet so i am quite pleased. These are NOT hot but rather have a delightful, mild spiceness - great picked right off the bush or quickly stir fried. They can be mistakenly named pepperoncini but they are smaller, thinner and have a different flavour. The seeds are also hard to find. I have had a lot of trouble growing these little beauties with maybe one bush surviving at a time and not many peppers. even my own seeds collected from my own ripened and dried peppers wouldnt germinate. The bush is small and so are the peppers - thin and long. Right now they are about 5 inches high, in a raised bed with pintos, alpine strawberries, broccoli, epizote and lots of greens.
    I have seeds from the south american rocoto hot pepper. I collected them from a fresh red one. They are on a scale with the jalapeno but a gorgeous bright red colour and look like a small apple. In fact the mexican name, chile manzano, seems appropriate. Here are some images: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=rocoto&qpvt=rocoto&FORM=IGRE
     
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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Bea, i dont know specifically about hot peppers but the general symptoms you are describing make me think your soil is infected and a bit run down.
    I'm trying to remember what your fertilizing regime is.
    But your 3yo plant sounds like it is lacking potassium and nitrogen or may have nematodes around its roots which will prevent the plant getting proper nutrition.
    The others that fail to germinate or don't grow well or drop fruit just sounds like starving soil or perhaps fungal infection.
    Calcium helps to hold flowers, fruit and leaves as well as carry nutrition and moisture up the stem.

    So a few possibilities to work through but the first thing to do is apply a heap of quality fertilizer, followed by a soil drench.
    Or dig the plants out of the ground, wash the roots very well to remove all soil then pop into a bucket of weak bleach or copper for a few minutes to kill nematodes and fungal issues. Then pot up into quality potting mix that already has fertilzfer in it.

    Chili plants transplant very well generally. Each plant may need a good prune top and bottom.
     
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  3. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    You're doing well to get three years out of a chili bush - I know that's generally the expected lifespan but I usually regrow a new plant from seed every two years to keep them fresh.

    Personally, we've always had a hard time growing large sweet peppers (capsicums) on our property. The fruit fly love them and so do the caterpillars but if I net them it's better obviously albeit a pain to do.
     
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