Humane Poultry Killer (from Morrigan)

Discussion in 'Poultry, Domestic Livestock, Pets, & Bees' started by Mark, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Raelene

    Raelene Member Premium Member

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    It's meant to be Portuguese Chicken, I forgot to say I also squeeze some lemon juice in as well and shove the rest of the lemons in after, they turn out so tasty as well. My family were so happy with this recipe, I have also minced the chicken breast and made a meat loaf, that was good too. There is nothing better than looking at a plate full of food and knowing you grew it all :)
     
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  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    So true! It's very satisfying and healthy...
     
  3. Tim C

    Tim C Two heads are better than one Premium Member GOLD

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    To forego any blood or violence, you could sit the chooks down in front of a few repeat episodes of Days of our lives.....That should bore them to death:hysterical:
    On a serious note, has anyone heard of roadkill chicken?. You take a whole prepared bird and put it in a sturdy plastic bag. Place this between 2 strong planks of wood, and carefully run the car wheel over it. Then cook the flattened bird on the BBQ...Dead-set-honest !
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Or the Bold and the Beautiful. I stopped watching that after the old Ridge left ;)

    No, I've never heard of road kill chicken but I could imagine it on the menu at Hogs Breath Café. I expect it is a bogans way of tenderising the meat hey? :D

    Back on topic, I haven't tried this method of despatch on ducks yet but I intend to give it a go on a duck in about 3 months.
     
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  5. Tim C

    Tim C Two heads are better than one Premium Member GOLD

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    MMMMM. Crispy skin duck with plum sauce. That's my favorite Asian dish.
     
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  6. Scott Mac

    Scott Mac Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Oh
    That is the funniest thing I've ever heard. Anyone tried beer can chook?

    I keep all my roosters and have not yet had a tough bird. I let sit for 2-3 days.

    All my turkeys are boys, their never tough except the legs. They need slow Cooked or turned into snags.

    In regards new dispatcher, I've never heard of not bleeding your stock, whether bird or beast. Have you ever cut your finger with a sharp knife and felt no pain for at least 60 secs. I use cone and one swift slice and find the birds pass out quick and calm. I don't chop head off

    For rabbit, I knock out with one slap to the back of the head then chop.

    Lamb or goat a .22 slug then cut artery

    Any way, as long as you try your best to keep it quick and humane.

    I have a plucker for when I process large numbers, slaughter 4 at a time with cones and fully finish the birds then onto another 4. That way you've not got a whole bunch of dead birds that are sitting around for hours waiting for cleaning
     
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  7. Scott Mac

    Scott Mac Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I have had a tough bird, one I cooked 2 hours after slaughter. Never do that again.
     
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  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    So you would recommend resting the bird in the fridge for several days?

    The birds are bled - the process of breaking the neck severs an artery also and the birds bleed out internally. But, some people still bleed the bird the old way once the neck is broken. You'd be surprised how many people can't chop a head off or slit a throat of a bird but find breaking the neck easier. Not only that, it's much safer than throwing an axe or knife around whilst you're wrestling a bird into position (especially for inexperienced people). For guys who have experience with knives and killing animals it's not hard to slit or chop a neck I agree and I'm fine using my killing cone or my stump and machette - for quail I use kitchen shears.

    In Dick Strawbridge's book Practical Self Sufficiency he recommends breaking the necks of birds (especially larger breeds like turkeys) and then slitting the throat. In his book they show an example of breaking the neck by holding the bird down with a broom handle across the back of the neck and then pulling the bird sharply upwards. A friend of my Brother in-law, which I met over in South Africa waits for the chooks to go to bed at night then he has a unique technique where he quietly picks up the bird then quickly flicks it over his head swiftly breaking the neck.

    Nope - not me

    I want to get a poultry plucker one day...
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2014
  9. Scott Mac

    Scott Mac Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    resting all animals is recommended. I hang my lambs/goats for minimum 24hrs though 4 days to 7 gives you beaut tender meat. chooks 24 - 48 hrs, turkey 24hrs at least, better at 48 - 36 hrs. Cows for 10 days min.

    I get the internal bleeding now.

    got to try that road kill method. Have you tried it Tim? I haven't tried beer can chook.
    One of our favourites is slice turkey breast into cubes or strips, marinate in abc soy sauce and sweet chilli. Cook on a bbq and sit meat on top of a salad.

    I've cut a lamb without using a bullet first. I dropped lamb on it's side, tied opposite side front and back legs. shaved neck for a quick clean slice. Calmed animal for a few minutes with a pat, then make the cut and the lamb passed quick and calmly. always with a very sharp knife. I use a 22 slug first usually as the wife can't stand the thought of just cutting our stock.

    Because I only have a small amount of animals, I hand feed them as much as possible. it makes it much easier to catch them on process day. though night time visit to the pen is easier still.

    Our plucker went well, how ever I discovered a burner under the water container for soaking the birds is necessary. the temp(65deg) drops too quick and you end up finishing off a lot by hand.
    we processed 13 birds pretty quick.
     
  10. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah, we did this with goats when I was in the military (survival training up north) and it is pretty quick I have to admit. I think they lose consciousness almost immediately.

    I was wondering about that - when I do three or four chooks at once by hand I need to put the burner on and off otherwise the temp drops and plucking is harder. I don't know how I'm going to go when I start processing my ducks - I think I'll have to fork out for a plucker so I can get through it faster...
     
  11. Susie Pedersen

    Susie Pedersen Member Premium Member

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    Hi Mark -thanks for all the info, my husband and I were raised in the city although we both have country in our hearts :)
    We've been raising chickens for eggs but decided we'ld like to learn to process our own Heirloom breed organic free range birds to avoid eating generically processed poultry! We've had a hard time trying several techniques but all were rather gastly and difficult. I can't remember how I came across your video but are so glad We did!
    We can't wait to order one of these Morrigan Farm neck breaking divices - we believe it will make the process much easier and most importantly - humane!
    Would you consider another video showing your process directly after using the divice? Thanks! Mark n Susie of "peder'slil'farm"
     
  12. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Hi Susie, firstly welcome to SSC and thanks for becoming part of our online community.
    Sometimes commercially grown poultry can become too over processed and artificially "perfect" so much so that it loses its taste. It's hard to describe but I think there's even a big difference between a commercially free-ranged bird and a barn raised one.

    I should start by saying there's no real way to kill a bird without any distress to the person doing the job (unless they're really cold hearted) it's not a very nice thing to do - I'm sure you know this but I'm just clarifying.

    Chopping the head clean off with an axe (I use a machete) on a block or cutting it off with a sharp knife whilst the bird is in a cone are both very swift and painless ways to despatch poultry. However, these ways are more gruesome (and potentially dangerous) for the person to do than the neck breaking method.

    Neck breaking can be done without a purpose made neck breaking device like the Morrigan by using a broomhandle technique or even by hand quite simply without much effort, although, they do require a good technique to ensure the deed is done clinically.

    The Morrigan neck breaking device (or humane poultry killer) works well but it's obviously very different to head removal. However, the reason I am painting a picture here is because with head removal you know the bird is definitely dead but when you break the neck of a bird it can sometimes seem like it's still alive for several minutes after and this can be disconcerting for people. So I guess it depends on which way you look at it in deciding if it is more humane or not than the chop.

    Having said that, as soon as the bird's neck is broken it can't possibly feel anything and 9/10 times they're dead still in seconds. 1/10 times the chicken will look alive and may move its head or look conscious for several minutes.

    The other contentious thing about killing poultry by neck breaking is the notion that the bird doesn't bleed out. However, the neck can still be cut after the breaking if there's any concerns about the meat being "stronger" due to the blood not draining out properly although the birds does technically bleed out internally anyway.

    To finally answer your question, let me think about doing an explicit video showing the Morrigan in action unedited - I do have a young rooster that needs to be despatched soon so I might film it then... we'll see. I'd be bound to get a lot of hate mail LOL :)

    Edit: I assume you mean filming the process of killing the bird or do you mean processing it after killing?
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
  13. Andy

    Andy Member Premium Member

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    Hello Mark,
    I've recently bought a humane poultry killer, I understand its operation (thanks to your guide), you mentioned setting the gap to 8mm for your chickens but how do you decide upon the gap size, or happen to have a recommendation for fairly large Aylesbury Ducks?
    Thanks
     
  14. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Hi Andy, welcome to SSC mate :)

    Yes, 8mm gap is purely a guide but the test is in the operation TBH as the device is supposed to break the neck without severing or cutting. I would set it on about 8mm or slightly more for bigger birds and see how it goes if you find it cutting through then adjust it a little wider ao the neck breaks but not the skin.

    Of course if you intend to cut the neck directly after the breaking then it's all academic really and the main thing is to ensure the neck breaks so a lower gap will ensure that.

    I've used mine like this recently (like a stunner) before cutting and it's a much safer and less violent way to despatch a bird (in my opinion anyway) than the block or cone methods.
     
  15. Andy

    Andy Member Premium Member

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    Thank Marks, tried 12mm as quite large birds, worked brilliantly. Think a plucker might be on the Christmas list. Finished birds still look like they've been run-over by the LandRover, reckon I need a little more practice!
     
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  16. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Great to hear 12mm worked well Andy!

    Yeah I feel your pain when it comes to plucking ducks... :p

    I used my new plucker for the first time the other day and it did the chicken perfectly but I still had a tough time stripping the ducks :(

    It's better than plucking ducks completely by hand but I think we should start another thread specifically on plucking ducks and see what information we can collect to make it easier.
     
  17. SAJay

    SAJay Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hey Everyone,

    Does anyone know where I can get one of these other than Morrigan Farm. They have been out of stock for a couple of months and they wont be available until at least January 2016. Was hoping to get one for Christmas.
     
  18. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    I'll be looking out for one too, so please let us know once you find out where one can be found in Aus.
     
  19. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Have you seen this one Wall Mounted Poultry Chicken Dispatcher from the UK? I read they do post internationally...

    I can't vouch for the quality etc of the UK device but if anyone gets one please let us know what you think. Once I get the reviews system finished on our blog it can be also reviewed over there, which would be a great help to many people seeking this type of device and wondering what it's like.
     
  20. SAJay

    SAJay Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Mark,
    I did check that one out but it doesn't appear to do the same thing as the aussie one. It just seems to hold the birds head in position while you pull the birds body back breaking the neck.

    Thanks anyway.
     
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