Featured Question How many edible plants do you grow?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Steve, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    536
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I always just knew those berries as blackberries.
    but then kids will call a thing what it looks like anyway if they never get to know its real name.
     
  2. Mataeka

    Mataeka Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    May 24, 2017
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I've known it as a nightshade for years although my older sister told me they were deadly nightshade and then tried to convince me they were edible by pretending to eat one ... I guess last laugh is on her since they actually are edible? :chuffed:
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Been in the new house for about a year now so thought best I update my list seeing I started this thread...

    Cherry tree
    Feijoa
    Avocado
    Papaya
    Bay Leaf
    Orange
    Mandarin
    Lime (tahitian and finger lime)
    Pepino
    Lemon
    Banana (Lady Finger and Cav)
    Coconuts (x2)
    Blueberry
    Olive (Kala and some other type?)
    Apples (Tropical Sweet and Tropic Anna)
    Pear
    Dwarf Peach
    Macadamia
    Cumquats
    Chilies (various)
    Thyme
    Rosemary
    Parsley
    Coriander
    Lettuce
    Chives
    Spring Onions
    Buk Choi
    Carrots
    Mint
    Lemongrass
    Curry leaves
    Lemon Scented Tea Tree (just because you can make tea from it :sneaky:)
    Ginger

    I think that's about it. Sitting at 34 I think. When I started this thread I had 16 so I'm pretty happy with that improvement. Plus now I have multiple of some of these types which makes it even better now. :twothumbsup:
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Love it! Love it! x 1
  4. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Messages:
    792
    Likes Received:
    304
    Location:
    SE Queensland, Australia
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    That's a great list Steve. Where did you get the Cavendish banana from?
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Thanks @letsgo
    The banana's came from Turner's Garden Centre at Rochedale in Brissy.
    From what I've read they come from a grower up in NQ.
    They only had one Cav left when I bought these and I hear they sell out fairly fast.
    But they did have a few different varieties which I thought was pretty cool.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    536
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Yes Steve that certainly is an extensive list.
    I'm guessing its one of those coconuts that is causing you angst getting your car & trailer past?

    Here is a link to a banana selling nursery. They also provide links to many other outlets on their home page.

    http://backyardbananas.com.au/

    They do need to update their info though, about all the banana growing regions in QLd & what varieties can be grown.
    All the banana growing regions are gone now in Qld. Any banana can be grown anywhere. Any variety available in Australia can now be grown in Qld. I'm not sure about other states.
    This is great for those who want to grow different types like cooking bananas or ornamental varieties or simply something other than cavs or ladies.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Sure is @ClissAT. Damn that Coconut! :rolleyes:
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,589
    Likes Received:
    1,048
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    You have been busy Steve! That's great mate :cheer:

    How are you settling in with respect to managing your property, self-sufficiency, and work etc?
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Hi Mark, yes pretty busy. :heat: Thanks.

    Settling in has been hard work but rewarding at the same time.
    Only a few short months after we moved in we had our first child so that just zapped all the time I had on the property.
    I would have loved to get fruit trees in earlier but time just got away from me.
    Working full time and with the bub I only really get half a day on the weekends to get some solid work done.
    I commute over 2 hours each day now for work which cuts into my home time so getting something done during the week just ain't no fun.

    But I wouldn't have it any other way mate.
    The place is looking good, after fencing, putting in a 'pretty' front garden, lawns, build retaining walls, etc etc, I now have herbs and trees in and my current project is a chook house and veggie garden beds which will make me so much happier once they're done. The only plants that have died are the ones that dont give me food so I'm happy with that.

    Since moving in our internet connection is woeful (wireless only) as the NBN has been postponed once again and we can't get ADSL here. It makes life on the internet a right pain.

    All in all, life is good. :cheers:
     
    • Like Like x 3
  10. garden in port

    garden in port Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
     
  11. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,589
    Likes Received:
    1,048
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Our experience is very similar to yours - some days it can be a grind developing the acreage from a blank canvas but as it grows and gets better with every little improvement you look out, walk around and appreciate what you've built - it's hard to explain...

    Nina (my wife) is currently working away FIFO, but above all, being away has shown her how much shes loves acreage living and when she's back instead of sitting inside and resting etc she's often outside digging, pruning, planting, and wearing the blisters on her hands like a badge of honor! God bless her cotton socks... :)
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    So true Mark.

    My wife and I were just thinking through all the little projects I've done since we moved in and once you start listing them you realise you've done a fair bit.
    I just can't wait till some of these trees start producing. At the moment they are just twigs in the ground... :cool:
     
  13. DarrenP

    DarrenP Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Mid North SA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    OK, a belated entry from me.
    In no particular order:
    orange
    lemon
    grapefruit
    mandarine
    plum
    apricot
    nectarine
    fig
    passionfruit
    dwarf pomegranate
    pumpkin
    cucumber
    tomato
    capsicum
    chilli
    sweetcorn
    squash
    zucchini
    lettuce
    leek
    spring onion
    beans
    watermelon
    rockmelon
    sunflower
    nasturtium
    kale
    mint
    coriander
    basil
    thyme
    sage
    sorrel
    oregano
    parsley
    lemonbalm
    lemongrass
    garlic
    beetroot
    carrots
    radish
    I think that's all. I did a mental tour of the yard, lol.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Nice one @DarrenP

    I hadn't heard of a Dwarf Pomegranate but I suppose just about everything comes in 'dwarf' size these days. :twothumbsup:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,589
    Likes Received:
    1,048
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    They grow really fast and fruit within a year on a small bush not quite knee high. The problem is the fruit is small and often they dry out and aren't worth harvesting... well, in my experience anyway.
    dwarf Pomegranate fruit and flower.jpg
     
  16. DarrenP

    DarrenP Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Mid North SA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    I was led to believe that the fruit was virtually the same, it was just the size of the tree/bush that was smaller. Interesting. Might have to find room for a full sized tree. Add it to the wish list (persimmon, olive, lime), lol.
     
  17. DarrenP

    DarrenP Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Mid North SA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Thanks Steve. And that's abiding by your rules of no varieties. I've got 6 varieties of pumpkin growing, 5 cucumbers, and three sweetcorn. I know they say to grow the different varieties far apart, but we'll just have to wait and see how the seeds turn out next season. Also have 5 varieties of tomatoes growing, and several of the fruit trees are multiples to lengthen the cropping.
    I planted summer Valencia oranges luckily, because in the winter there are so many free oranges in town.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Robyn67

    Robyn67 Active Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2017
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    13
    Climate:
    Cold, Cool, Mountains, or Artic
    Here's my list of which most of the fruit trees I can inherited when we bought the place (although last year I did grow lots of veggies myself, this year the sheep got in and I have let it overgrow)
    Spring onions,
    Rhubarb
    Potatoes
    Celery
    Mint
    Majoram
    Plums
    Apricots
    Apple
    Mulberry
    Figs
    Hazelnut
    Pear
    Passion fruit
    Kiwi fruit
    Grapes
    Finger lime
    Peach
    Blackberries
    Nectarine
    Irish strawberry tree
     
    • Like Like x 3
  19. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,120
    Likes Received:
    536
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical

    OH NO!!!! I hope that's not what I've got! Mine flowered & bore in the first year too.
    I didn't expect that to happen. I purchased from a person I believed to be a reliable supplier & was told my seedling trees were from wild stock that had lovely big juicy fruit.
    But the best I get are these nasty little bullets. What a waste!
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  20. DarrenP

    DarrenP Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Mid North SA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Ours hasn't hardly grown since I planted it. My patience is wearing thin; non-productive means out it comes.
     
Loading...

Share This Page