Hello from Sydney/North East Vic

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Spud, Jan 19, 2020.

  1. Spud

    Spud Member Premium Member

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    Hi everyone!
    A journey through the rabbit hole of internet soil nutrition and mulching tips landed me here - and what a fab gem I've found. Looks like there is a lot of worldly knowledge to learn from.
    My name is Naomi, but please call me Spud. The photo is myself and my lovely partner (Potato). The story of our nicknames is a long one, but together we are TOPSpud (The Original Potato + Spud ;) ). Obvs this comes from a long obsession with potatoes which brought us together...

    Anyhoo.. so sadly my folks have been recently affected by the bushfires in North East Vic (in the little community of Mount Alfred in the Upper Murray). They live on a little hobby farm, my childhood home, which they have lived on for 30 years and have no plans to go anywhere. Over the years, my mother has lovingly planted up several native tree sections along with a lush organic garden that supplies delicious veggies and spirit-boosting / fauna-loving flowers for them. While we have been far more fortunate than many to have our house and animals safe, any many of our trees survived, the veggie garden and tree plantations will need quite some TLC over the months/years ahead. (hence the research into soil nutrition and mulching techniques).

    My folks have been on the self-sufficiency path for years, and my partner and I have just started our journey together, but one of the greatest lessons from these fires (for me at least) is the need to become as self-sufficient as possible. And with backups for your backups, especially re water and energy ;)

    If anyone has any tips for helping improve soil nutrition and water retention after fire, I would love to hear them. (Or other fire proofing / fire recovery tips!). In particular, the little bottle brushes and banksias suffered the most and mum's poor roses didn't fair well (though she expects they will bounce back with some love).
    Having just joined this online community, admins - please feel free to let me know if this may be best as a separate thread.

    I hope you all stay happy, healthy and safe. Big love to community helping to share knowledge and support for each other. :heart:
     
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  2. GKW

    GKW Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    G'Day Spud and welcome.

    Sorry to hear about the impact of the fires on the family patch. Hope that all is back on an even keel sooner than later.

    I don't profess to know much about the science of soil / backyard produce but living in a city with water restrictions I'm keeping it simple re soil and water use, so plenty of moo / chook poo compost and decent mulch to keep the water evap from the garden beds to a minimum.

    Good luck with the journey.
     
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  3. Spud

    Spud Member Premium Member

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    Thanks GKW! Plenty of moo & chook poo about on the farm we can make use of :)

    Re mulch - do you make your own? I'm trying to find a decent mulcher for mum, preferably on the lower end of the price scale.
     
  4. GKW

    GKW Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Living in the city, it's easy to make your compost from grass, other green foliage etc but mulch is a tad harder. I had a small mulcher / shredder some years back but more trouble than it was worth. Mark did a good vid on a medium sized mulcher a few months back (re Mark Youtube channel). Seemed to work a treat.



    Other that than, I but the cane sugar mulch from Bunnings. Decent size for not much $ and goes a long long way.

    Cheers

    Greg W
     
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  5. Wedgetail

    Wedgetail Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Spud hope you enjoy the forum lots of interesting topics and knowledgeable people to be found here hope the recovery for your family goes well . Cheers Dave
     
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  6. Spud

    Spud Member Premium Member

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    Cheers Dave!
     
  7. DTK

    DTK Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Spud, welcome. Great initial posts and I echo comments above re impact of fires. I buy both sugar cane mulch plus lucerne. I have been buying from growers where possible in order to support them. My alternate source for these mulches is Bunnings.

    I have two small mulchers and I use them but they only handle small branches and small quantities at that. I am seriously looking into buying the Hansa mulcher that Mark is using.

    All the best,

    Dan
     
  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yes, separate threads for separate discussions/topics in the right forums are always best but we've been pretty liberal with the intros so if they run a little off-topic and into a few questions about other things or showcasing a property that's fine as long as subsequent threads are created for further new topics.

    Ash isn't necessarily a bad thing for the soil (as we all probably know it can be very good) so as long as the soil isn't contaminated I would be incorporating as much organic matter as I could find to improve a "dead bed" or "dead soil" such as manures - be careful not to add too much chicken poo (a little is great) but not heaps at once as it can make soil too acidic or even over fertile.

    Old cow manure is quite mild as fertiliser but excellent as organic fill for soil to improve water holding and introduce microbes and worms.

    As others have written, mulch is very important and home-made compost of course. A good set of compost bays to make compost from all the scraps that don't get fed to the animals and any extra garden waste is a must for any organic garden I reckon!

    Welcome to SSC :)
     
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