Height of raised beds

Meesh

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Aug 24, 2020
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Hello all--
I would love to have raised beds like Mark's, but I'm also thinking that for perennials like rhubarb, blueberry bushes, etc that
something shorter would be more realistic/useful. I am trying to design long-term; our backyard is chain-link fenced, and I'd
like to create perennial beds along the inner L of the corner. What are your collective thoughts on having a 2 ft wide, 18" high
galvanized steel "L" that's approximately 40' long on each side just for perennials? Would that be deep enough to reap the benefits
of hugelkultur style layering?
Thanks in advance,
Meesh
 
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nzmitzi

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you can dig down below ground level to make the hugelkultuur bed only 18 inches above ground..... it's just as effective
 
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DTK

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G'day Meesh,

I would agree that if you only want your beds 18" high then you probably need to lower the original level for the bed of logs/stumps etc. My beds are on average about 600mm high. I would happily grow rhubarb in them, so long as we could reach across (2' should be no trouble to you). Best of luck,
 
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Rick

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Hi Meesh, some of the garden beds I have at home are installed on a slopping block and are from 400 mm to 600mm, and I dug into the ground to have hügelkultur beds. They are easily accessed and have grown some great veggies

I noticed you live in East Tennessee so a similar climate to where I live –well maybe a bit colder than here. But I use these homemade hoops covers, see in black on picture attached to allow me to grow through frosts etc and I use a mini plastic hot house that I got from New Zealand to improve my seedling growth. Extends my growing time considerably
Good luck with you new projects
 

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DTK

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Hi Rick, I like the look at you covers. Are able to share more photos without the cover? I am keen to see the frame work / design. Taaa
 

Rick

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Hi Dan no problems are you interested in the plastic covered ones or the shade cloth covers or both. Am at the farm tomorrow and again Sat until the afternoon so will get some pictures sorted for you when i get back.

Rick
 

DTK

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Rick, thank you. I am particularly interested in how you made the hoops to allow the covers to be put over them. The actual cover is less important to me. I will be using them for a birdnet cover to keep critters out.

Thanks
 

Rick

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Hi Dan, here are some pictures to explain how I built the hoops

I use a lightweight cover for frost, cats and birds and do reduce wind damage. It’s cheaper to buy it in a pack and I utilise small hoops to make little hot houses. —my beds are made from sleepers, but these hoops can also work on metal beds

I use Vinidex 25mm x 50m role -- Blue Poly Pipe and a pipe mounting bracket—attached to the sleeper on each side. You can install the pipe on the outside of the sleeper. To get all your pipes the correct length ---working on a 1.5 mtr wide bed. You need to be a half circle so – A = Half curve A = 3.14 x Radius (75 cm) =235.6 cm then you need a min 30 cm extra for each side to push through the mounting bracket so total cut length of each pipe is 235.6 +60 cm = 295.6cm. This will give you a 75cm heights of the hoop. I have 1.5 mtr wide beds and wanted a higher hoop height. about 90 cm so my pipes, from memory are about 255cm with 60 cm of push through (315.00). The best way is to cut the first pipe longer than you need (longer than the radius of your half circle) and cut back until you reach your preferred height of your hoop. To tie the top of the pipes together I use 20ml PVC pipe and zip locks. (see pictures) I am running nylon rope along the hoops as well to help hold the covering you use but you can run 3 or 4 lengths of 20 ml PVC pipe see pictures. The hoops are spaced 80cm to 90 cm apart any more than that and you get sagging from you covering. The cover is permanently attached to the middle /top PVC Piping and you can fold back from each side.

To hold the cover to the sleepers or ground I have attached a decking board to the side of the sleeper sitting high so that I can fold the covering into the valley and drop a 45mm wide cut length of pine in on top of the covering again see pictures. (sleepers are 50mm wide)

The plastic covered hot house is one I purchased from Victoria but comes out of New Zealand. Great for when it is cold so I can extend my growing time heaps. I am not sure if i can mention the companies name on a forum as it might be seen as adverting--don't know the rules --but if i am allowed to then i will send it through. Otherwise i can send the contact to you directly ????

The hoops have a wire pull down locking systems that holds the plastic or other covers in place. They stand up to strong winds. Did not lose one plant in the winter time once I started using these. I have attached a few pictures to show you how they look. I drill 2 holes in the metal hoop below the locking point of the wire pull down locks and then screw them into the side of the bed.

Hope this helps, happy to clarify anything if I have not explained myself properly

Rick
 

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