Healthy eggplant/aubergine suddenly dies

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Mark, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Anyone know why my perfectly healthy eggplant has suddenly withered and died?

    The root system is good and looks normal (I've pulled the plant out) and it was growing fine up until a few days ago when it started to die. I suppose it is a virus of some sort?

    Last year I lost a few plants exactly the same way.

    egg plant died suddenly.jpg
     
  2. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    the kids poisoned it because they don't like eggplant :ROFL:
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    It's possible :D
     
  4. Lowden Ridge

    Lowden Ridge Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I had a similar problem a few years ago with tomatoes....and it looks like it could be the same problem which I found out to be bacteria wilt - which is a soil born disease and can easily spread if you have kept the same type of plants in the same beds for a long period. It will affect tomatoes, capsicums, potatoes, eggplants etc.... How long have the eggplants been growing on that bed.... if that is what it is then you need to follow up with a bean crop and not plant those types of plants in that bed for 2 rotations . you can also sterilise the soil by covering with plastic and letting the sun cook it....but I would still follow up with a different legume crop. hope that helps
     
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  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Right - bacteria wilt hey? Bugger - I got capsicums and a tomato in the same bed too!

    This is the first crop of eggplant/capsicums in this bed but I did bring in some horse manure from a new place and top dressed the bed with it - I wonder if I introduced the bacteria via the poop? Perhaps it is confined to the one spot for now and hopefully I'll be lucky enough to get some good produce before the rest drop dead... I think I see some signs of wilt in the other eggplant but it might be paranoia - it seems to be growing well but as I found out they don't take long to go from good to dead.

    Once this crop is done, or when they all cark it, I'll do the sterilisation plastic method you suggested and grow some legumes. Any idea how long I should "cook" the soil for?

    raised bed with lettuce capsicum tomato eggplant.jpg

    At least I have one fruit...

    eggplant in raised bed.jpg

    Bell capsicums are looking great!

    capsicum in raised bed.jpg

    Banana capsicums in the same bed.

    banana capsicum in raised bed.jpg
     
  6. Lowden Ridge

    Lowden Ridge Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    How did the eggplants go.Did you lose anymore of them ....
    as far as how long to cover in the plastic see below

    Solarization is a simple nonchemical technique that captures the radiant heat and energy from the sun and causes physical, chemical, and biological changes in the soil. These changes lead to control, or suppression, of soilborne plant pathogens such as fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and pests along with weed seeds and seedlings.
    Solarization consists of covering the soil with a clear plastic tarp for 4 to 6 weeks during a hot period of the year when the soil will receive maximum direct sunlight. When properly done, the top 6 inches (15 cm) soil will heat up to as high as 125° F (52 ° C).
    Over several weeks, that's hot enough to kill a wide range of soil inhabiting pests such as; wilt and root rot fungi, root knot nematodes and noxious weed seed.
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Great info Carolyn And I'm definitely going to do this then test it by growing eggplant again!

    My second eggplant in that bed is also dying albeit a lot more slowly (at least we have got some fruit from the plant). So far all other plants including capsicum are flourishing so it must be eggplant specific...I assume?

    I have a few other eggplants in different locs which are doing ok for now so it seems to be isolated to this bed. Hmmm, we'll see...
     

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