GrumiChama time again!

Discussion in 'Food - Cooking, Preserving & Fermentation' started by ClissAT, Dec 3, 2017.

  1. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    On my rounds of the orchard the other evening I saw to my horror that the flying foxes had found the grumichamas.
    Most were almost ripe with about 1/3 the crop still quite green.
    But I had to pick right then in the failing light or there would be none left the next day.
    I grabbed 4lt ice cream container & just dragged as much fruit off the tree as I could see in the half dark until the container was over flowing.

    For a funny thing to do, I plonked the partly full container on the table with my dinner.
    All I can manage to eat at any one time is a handful of these luscious fruit.
    The rest went into the fridge.

    So dinner on 28November2017 consisted of some salad items wrapped in freshly picked lettuce leaves, followed by as many grumichamas as I could stuff in! :eat:

    They are fairly big this season & I realise when adding this photo to my folder on the pc that the previous season was in late January. So it has cropped very early this year or perhaps there'll be another crop in the coming January.
    dinner with grumicharmas.jpg
     
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  2. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yum, the flying foxes seem worst this year. We have ha stop bring mangoes in early than we would like as the foxes were eating around the outside of unripe mangoes.
     
  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yes Letsgo, they are doing that here too. So disheartening to see all my hard work being smashed by bl@@dy pesky critters.:censored:
    I lost half the crop in a hail storm couple weeks ago, now the bats are working their way through the rest.
    Just eating the skin off the half grown fruit & dropping the innards to the ground all over the place.
    Lots of back breaking work for me to go round the 5 trees daily to pick up all the potential mowing day missiles before they get lost in the fast growing grass.
     
  4. Kasalia

    Kasalia http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/ Premium Member

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    Picked mine just now, first really big crop this year. 20171204_165550.jpg


    Now what to do with it?
     
  5. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Eat 'em! :D
     
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  6. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Amazing fruit!
    Thanks for sharing these. They look so healthy and a fantastic alternative to cherry.
     
  7. Robyn67

    Robyn67 Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    yum - perhaps some yummy jam. We have native birds eating our fruit - I will net them next year, but this year hasn't been good for anything except the apples.
     
  8. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yum looks great.
     
  9. Sharann

    Sharann Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Is the grumichama related to cherries? Flying squirels must be a pest, are you able to do pest control for them?
     
  10. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Flying foxes are protected. Since they are high in the trees there doesn’t seem to be a lot people can do. Have heard of people going out and making noises and bashing etc to scare them off but I don’t think much really works. Smaller trees of course can be netted and also bag individual fruits.
     
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  11. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Same here...

    Our biggest issue is the fruit fly. I got a shock after I harvested about 50 and then put them in the fridge overnight for safekeeping before making jam only to find a heap of fruit fly maggots in the base of the container the next day - they had burrowed out of the fruit due to the cold! Yuk... There was no sign of sting on the berries.
     
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  12. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I must keep an eye out for that now Mark.
    I have been thinking GC's didn't get attacked by FF.
     
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