Growing ginger in a food forest

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Mark, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,496
    Likes Received:
    1,018
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I really like this concept of growing ground crops under canopy - they're calling it food forest. In this example the presenter talks about growing ginger as a ground crop under fruit trees but there are many other plants that could be grown underneath fruit trees.

    I'm currently experimenting with growing herbs and strawberries under fruit trees in posts and it's going pretty well! This video has given me several ideas for replacing my grassed areas in my orchard with mulch and food crops like ginger, taro, arrowroot, sweet potato, yams, and a zillion other types of suitable plants.

     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Love it! Love it! x 1
  2. Janine

    Janine Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    May 17, 2018
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Barossa Region
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Do you have any videos or info about the flower cycle of ginger or harvesting/growing timelines that I could use here in South Oz please?
     
  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    986
    Likes Received:
    465
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Ginger comes from the moist tropics so needs warmth, water & open well aerated soil.
    It grows fairly well in sand provided adequate fertilizer of the right type is supplied.
    As for your cooler clime, I think you would need to find a microclimate against a north facing wall for it to grow well.
     
  4. Janine

    Janine Active Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    May 17, 2018
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Barossa Region
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Thanks heaps for such a prompt reply but if doesn't quite answer my question so I will keep looking... I do appreciate your time. I live in quite a Mediterranean climate so can add humidity by turning off the sun during a hot day and adding the customary rain we get at harvest time! . Anyway Thanks heaps
     
Loading...

Share This Page