Question Greetings from south of Sweden

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Gander, Apr 16, 2019.

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  1. Gander

    Gander Member Premium Member

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    Greeting!

    I´m Alexzander (called Gander). I´m soon 26 and currently studying history at Lunds university in south of Sweden. I live in a student flat so sadly I have no space to grow really heavy/ space taking crops, but since I come from a long line of farmers I just can can not suppress the urge to grow plant now when spring is here! :)

    I´m mostly growing chilies since they are good to have in pots, but I also have some tomatoes, herbs and even trying to grow a lemon tree from seed, it´s currently about 14 months old and still living, surprisingly.

    When I grow up and get a place of my own, I know that I´m gonna grow a lot of plants, probably not so I can be self sufficient, but at least growing something! :)

    Now for some questions!

    First one) I´ve heard different opinions about putting chilies in a little large pot (steadily increasing the pots size). Since we don´t have that long of a growing season here in Sweden i wanna be able to get at least some fruits from them, and that steadily increasing the pot size increases the plants flower production. I´m gonna do an experiment with that this season, so if you are interested I can make some update about that! :) But I still wanna hear your experience with this!

    Second one) Do you have some tips for crops to grow in a very small space. I only have a small space on my stair leading up to my apartment. I´ve seen Marks videos about this, but there can never be to many tips!

    Sorry for a long text!

    Gander
     
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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi there Gander and welcome!

    I always think for size and shape, a styro broccoli box provides deepest growing medium for surface area and light weight of container. Its also a narrower box so fits into oddly shaped spaces such as on a step.

    I'm assuming here that broccoli is packed on the farm in the same shaped box world wide!

    Its quite late here as I write so I'm not going out to the potting shed to measure just now. But in the morning I will measure a box and maybe photograph one and add that info to this post.

    A broccoli box filled with lightweight coconut peat otherwise known as coir can produce quite a bounty.
    Several herb plants, a couple of picking lettuces, a mini tomato, a couple of beans and a few raddishes. If you had another smaller box or pot you could start seedlings in that one to plant on into the bigger box.

    The outside of the box can be painted to make it more acceptable and fit in better. Also I put the drain hole 50mm up from the bottom to form a sort of wicking bed. The bottom well can be filled with styro beads for lightest weight. I fill mine with softwood chips which are lighter than gravel or sand for example. I then lay a piece of old shade cloth over that material to prevent the growing medium mixing down into the well medium.
    I make the hole triangular shaped using a sharp pointed knife (serrated steak knife) driven through the styro. Far easier than trying to make a round hole and no need to put any sort of drain pipe in unless you need to collect the draining water.

    But one thing to remember is if you have a lot of water running to waste from your box, you are overwatering anyway and need to reduce the volume being applied as it wastes the fertilizer.


    Now about the chili plant.
    As long as you provided suitable fertilization, a plant will grow in next to no volume. A chili should grow in a 150mm wide round or square pot with a depth of around 200mm. Foliar fertilization is best although when I grow plants in pots I also always add a serving of slow release fertilizer mixed into the potting mix.

    It's the quality of fertilizer that determines the number and quality of flowering and fruiting success.

    So make up a one litre spray pack of half strength foliar fertilizer and spray your plants every few days.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2019
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  3. Gander

    Gander Member Premium Member

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    Thanks for the reply and the welcome! :)

    The broccoli box-tips are a great one, had to look up what that is since in Sweden we have broccoli in regular cardboard boxes. I´m gonna look for one and if I have space I will get at least one!!

    I´ve never heard about foliar fertilization but I will try it, had to read some articles about it! I will plant mostly of my chilies in a round pot that is 21cm in diameter and 21cm deep. I will use a mix of potting soil and cow dung and then use a liquid fertilization.

    Thanks for the tips! :)
     
  4. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Sorry, it was my intention to measure one of my broccoli boxes today for you, but its been bucketing down with rain all day and I don't feel like getting wet. But I will do it.

    1minute later.......
    Here we go! https://www.omegapackaging.com.au/products/broccoli-box-a11/

    Should be able to get one or more used only once at your local fruit shop.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2019
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  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Hi @Gander and thank you for joining us!

    Well done on growing in a small space - this takes commitment and I really admire people who think outside the box and follow their dreams or hobbies regardless of the obstacles because there's always something to gain and learn from this experience.

    One "tip" I would give on potting up chilies is to perhaps try starting them in the final container from the beginning that way there's no root disturbance and I don't think potting up such plants is worth the effort especially when the season is short.
     
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  6. Gander

    Gander Member Premium Member

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    It´s cool! No need to rush, I´m thankful for the tips ClissAT! :)
    Checked the broccoli box, sadly my closest store didn´t have any, but the quest will go on! ;)
     
  7. Gander

    Gander Member Premium Member

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    Thanks Mark! :)

    I´ve been thinking about putting them in their final pot at the beginning, but I didn´t do that this year because I only have one plant lamp. But it might be next years investment, or I´ll might set a plant at my parents place since the have more natural sun than my north pointing window does (I get no sunlight into my apartment at any time during the year).

    I´ve been thinking a little in the same way about the ``potting up´´, but I still think it needs a try (have some spare plant I will try it on)
     
  8. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yes Mark, indeed, that's the best way to start and grow chilies and to a lesser extent capsicum.
    Even though they germinate very easily, it still seems better and easier to grow them in their final pot.
    These days I just scatter chilies that dried on the bush into new food forest areas and let nature do the rest. Enough come up to keep the line going.
     
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