Tip Gardening Australia "vege guide" App for your phone

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Becca, Sep 25, 2015.

  1. Becca

    Becca Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    As I have mentioned before, I'm a LAZY gardener.

    I work full time, managing an Optical store. I work weekends and late nights. I am forgetful and easily sidetracked!

    Ooooh look shiny things! ;)

    I have no idea how I ended up on itunes... but I found the Vege Guide app for my IPhone, and I downloaded it. It's free!

    So I plugged in what postcode I live in, and the magic of the internet told me what climate region I'm in, and came up with plants that should, in general work in my climate. Then all I had to do was pick what I had planted, and it created my vege "patch" (I'll upload some screen shots this weekend) Basically, you either choose seed or seedling and it will list your plants in order of harvest dates.

    It has generic plants names on there, like tomato, cucumber etc... then you can add the name of the particular one you have. It's got a pretty good range of veges and basic herbs. I would prefer some flowers on there too... It only has marigold, no nasturtium or sunflower or anything like that.

    So, I think it's a pretty good tool for Newbies, and people who like to have a record of their harvests close at hand (on the phone) You can see what is growing now and when it's due for harvest, and what you have previously harvested, with dates etc. So handy when planning the next years garden, as you can make notes on each individual planting, so you could add whether it worked or not, what the yield was, whether you actually like the flavour, if bugs were a problem, ANYTHING really.

    Downside: I'm now depressed that I am going to have to wait 51 more days for my zucchini... :( hehehehe Where before I was winging it, with no idea when/if I was ever going to achieve anything edible! ;)


    xxBec
     
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  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah but once your zucchini starts fruiting it'll go wild - they're GREAT producers!

    Is this it Bec? Looks pretty good!


    Here's the iPhone app

    Not sure if there's an app for Android users - I can't seem to find one...
     
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  3. Becca

    Becca Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Yup that's the one Mark! :D
     
  4. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    I've had it for a while, and whilst I like the app it takes time to enter in all your activities and I like the idea of watching them grow in the flesh. It won't be textbook timing each time, so I tend to go by how it looks rather than when the app tells me the seedlings should be ready for harvest.
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    With every backyard being slightly different, allowing for microclimate, natural variations, adaptation, soil types, water consistently, greenhouse growing, and a million other things the app can only be a guide.

    I might use such an app to remind me of when to plant certain crops but over time a food gardener remembers this routine and then often learns how to break the rules to maximize yield or circumvent certain issues.

    Keeping your own garden diary or notes helps also.
     
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  6. Becca

    Becca Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I think it will help me, for the next couple of years. I agree though, once you get to know your land and microclimate it ends up being a gut feeling and instinct takes over
     
  7. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Experience makes a world of difference, especially in such a practical vocation as gardening.
    I have read a lot of stuff, but do you think it stopped me from making really basic mistakes and wasting a bunch of doe in the process?
    I now know all my fruit trees need netting, and not to buy trees looking shabby just because they're half the price of a stronger and healthier looking one...
     
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  8. Gaillygirl

    Gaillygirl Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I might download this and give it a try. Every little bit helps when your starting out.
     
  9. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Very true and I'm sure you're looking at all sorts of different resources to research growing food and that's a clever thing to do! There's certainly benefit in widening the search outside of one's local community, state, country, and even climate zone to broaden the knowledge then apply it back to our own property - I've learnt heaps via books or online mainly through blogs, or YouTube but apps are also a growing resource.

    Trial and error in your own garden is still one of the best ways to learn...
     
  10. April

    April Member Premium Member

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    Sounds like good place to start. I really want to become self sufficient from our small farm. My husband is the gardener - my job is the animals.
     
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