G’day from Perth WA

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Jack H, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Hi i’m Jack from Perth WA.

    I only started gardening about a year ago but I’ve been able to learn a ton from watching Marks videos and many others.
    I’m 23 and live in a rental with my girlfriend.
    I’m primarily a container grower as we only have sand where we are but I’ve found these cheap fabric pots seem to work really well.

    We try to live as self sufficient as we can and I’m always looking for ways to improve that.

    I hope to learn a ton more from this forum, and to share some of my experiences and knowledge with everyone.
    Cheers
    3D045F26-4F69-4A85-81A7-6F2BC384EEBB.jpeg

    EBB92B60-C3E1-4FCC-8B21-80AA9776A13B.jpeg
     
    • Love it! Love it! x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2012
    Messages:
    4,757
    Likes Received:
    1,139
    Location:
    Bellmere, QLD
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Love the container food garden @Jack H I mean this is really awesome!

    Not only food growing but it looks quite ornamental also... This is a perfect example of growing food in pots or containers when space or in-ground is not optimal.

    Welcome to SSC mate :)
     
  3. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Thanks Mark! Means a lot.:)
     
  4. Mark Seaton

    Mark Seaton Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Collie WA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    That is basically how I started, pots! The biggest problem you will face there is heat and drying out in summer. Make sure you keep the water up too them and maybe even running rows of 3 or something you can reach to let them insulate each other and keep the sun from getting to the bricks. Also you could maybe get some old carpet and put down on the pavers first to try and insulate a bit. I did grow pots in my courtyard, on pavers, but during summer it was a lot harder to keep them healthy especially when you get a few 40+ days in a row.
    Otherwise, good looking crop you have going there :)
     
  5. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Cheers for the advice mark.
    This is something I’ve already experienced and am a bit concerned with for the summer. Been looking at water trays to fit the bottom of these pots but I can’t really justify the price of them as all the trays I’ve seen cost more than the pots themselves.
     
  6. Mark Seaton

    Mark Seaton Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Collie WA
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    While water trays are good in some cases, like indoor plants, I am not a fan. If you can, I would go the route of making a temporary bed under the bags. you can use something like carpet as I suggested. Or if you can frame out an area and put down maybe some plastic to protect the paving (you don't want to get in trouble for staining it by the real estate) and then a layer of sawdust or something similar to hold a bit of moisture.
    I did this kind of thing for a pot plant area I have, it has been something my dad and granddad have done, so I kind of think of it as normal practice.
     
  7. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,514
    Likes Received:
    691
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Due to very poor soil that takes far too much effort to fix, I also garden mostly in containers.
    But your line up takes the cake, Jack!

    Yes to what Mark Seaton said about the need to protect them from the radiated heat from the pavers.

    I would try artificial grass if you can't get carpet that is ok to stay wet. I bought a roll of grass on ebay for not much money.
    I do use old carpet which I get for free from the bin outback of carpet shops but I am careful to only get nylon type carpet which will tolerate being wet.
    Put the grass or carpet down or move the containers from the pavers and put long lasting mulch along each side of your row.
    Another, albeit untidy solution would be cardboard which is free. If you got fridge boxes and cut them to fit along the sides of your row, you could make them look tidy, even do artwork on the cardboard.
    However I have a couple of those fabric containers and I do have them sitting in a bath constantly.

    The potting mix I use in my containers is 50/50 best quality potting mix and soaked coir with added home made compost and whatever fertilizer the resident plant requires. After about a year this mix settles a bot but becomes almost peat. It holds water far better then and takes compost easier as well.
     
  8. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Awesome advice guys thanks!,

    I do like the idea of Astro turf underneath and will have to look into it.
    I’ll be hooking up some drip irrigation to the pots for ease of watering and to prevent overhead watering completely.
    I might just be able to set it up on a timer and have it running everyday for 10 mins in summer or something.
     
  9. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,514
    Likes Received:
    691
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Knowing how potting mix dries out in the heat, I would not use drip irrigation.
    I would look at micro sprayers pushed into the sides aiming at the center of each pot.
    Its really easy to develop dry sectors in potting mix that just wont wet up again.

    And as far as timing goes, I think minimum 3times daily in the heat of summer for around 3 mins each time depending on the volume of the micro sprayers.
    The best way to water containers is from the bottom via deep saucers or well with watering from the top for quick top ups.

    My containers are all water wells (otherwise recently called wicking beds) and the drain hole is about 10cm up from the bottom so there is always a well of water in the bottom. The extra coir in the mix soaks up the moisture from the bottom as it evaporates away from the top. Then everyday that evaporation occurs, I water the whole garden from the top.
    In the hot dry summer months it evaporates very quickly, up to 4lt daily from a 30-40lt container with a mature tomato or a few greens in it.

    But I guess your containers all have drains in the bottom. Or are they the geo-fabric ones that just wick through the fabric everywhere?
    If so you can sit them on long lengths of builders plastic which can be wrapped up the sides and taped up to hold water.

    Then whenever the 'tray' empties (which will be everyday or even multiple times daily on the worst days), refill to the 10cm mark.
    You could have several groupings of plants, with those using less water all grouped together with a shallow tray.
    Those using the most water grouped together with the timer coming on more often for them.

    If the tray was a lot deeper it would hold 24-48hrs worth of water.
    This is a good way to know exactly how much water your garden uses. You'll be astounded at how much water is used.

    The plant sends its roots to find the water. Tomatoes in particular should be planted deep to the second top row of leaves when transplanted. The idea is to have a cool root run in summer so best the roots go well down.

    If you just have some drippers on the surface, the roots will congregate there and be exposed to the full heat and regular drying out which is not good for most vegies.

    Some of my containers are setup almost like bog beds with the drain holes high because in summer those plants use heaps of water.
     
  10. Mary Playford

    Mary Playford Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2014
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Elizabeth, Adelaide, South Australia.
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Oh wow, that is one serious gardening you have going over there, Jack. Self-sufficient is an awesome concept and the way to go in life. Don't forget to add flowers to your containers for the pollinators.

    You know, years ago, I grew some strawberries, herns, and potatoes in them bags you get at Kmart, Bunnings or at the supermarket. They are like the grow bags but cheaper :) Well, if you are not fussy with the way they look, they do the job. I have also used my daughter's old kiddie's pool to put the bags in. I drill a hole down the bottom on the side about 2 inches so excess can drain out.

    Keep us updated on your garden...cheers!
     
Loading...

Share This Page