Featured First watermelon harvested and banana talk

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Ash, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. Ann

    Ann Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yes, Mark I want to figure out an area for that. Citrus, figs and avocados also. I've always wanted to build an orangery. I believe it was the ancient Italian culture that built them out of stone. The sun would heat the area up for that very reason. An added plus would be a beautiful spot to drink wine in and watch your fruit grow!
     
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  2. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

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    Great effort with the watermelon. I tried a couple of plants once and I didnt get anything edible and very small.
    I put it down the woeful soil I had. I will have to try again some day....
     
  3. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Soil quality definitely helps and if not the best for the intended crop a bit of compost, manure or dynamic lifter may be the way to go.
     
  4. Joseph Isaac

    Joseph Isaac Active Member Premium Member

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    Hi everyone! I've read something about bananas so I decided to share some as well. I live in the tropics but some areas here have cooler climates much like those of temperate zones. In a nearby mountain from my place, bananas could be spotted and are growing even if the temperature is around 18-22ºC. Since I'm living in the lowlands, even at 34ºC, bananas would still grow. Although they would require abit more watering. If I may suggest, cavendish banana variety is one of the best variety and currently the ones my country is exporting. It isn't that tough / difficult to grow.
     
  5. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Interesting points there Joseph! Unfortunately, cavendish is a commercial only crop here in Australia (I think this is the case unless someone knows otherwise) which means we can grow other varieties of bananas in the home garden but not the cavendish type - it's for disease control reasons I believe...

    My preference is the larger lady fingers for backyard crops as they're plump and sweet. I have about three bunches forming at the moment but we're into our subtropical winter months so growth has slowed down so here's hoping for some nice spring bananas.
     
  6. Joseph Isaac

    Joseph Isaac Active Member Premium Member

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    Ooh. sorry to hear that. I guess, there are strict laws in which type of bananas / plants to grow in your place.

    I love lady fingers! Its the most common variety here and we just love it. Btw, I'm not sure if you know this but, have you tried eating banana heart?
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    No I haven't, but could you explain it please?
     
  8. Joseph Isaac

    Joseph Isaac Active Member Premium Member

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    This photo isn't mine. I just borrowed it from google. banana-heart.jpg

    Notice the gap between the banana fruit and the heart (Red thing) ? It is uncommon for bananas to develop after such gap. You can cut the heart and cook it. It would be a waste since there are only few uses of the banana heart. You can also dry the flowers inside the banana heart.
    Here are sample recipes in which you can use banana heart. You can substitute the milk fish with any kind of fish or meat. :



    http://filipinostylerecipe.com/2012/10/ginataang-puso-ng-saging/
    http://www.pinoyrecipe.net/sinigang-na-bangus-with-puso-ng-saging/ (if you don't have tamarind, vinegar would do. but make sure to boil the vinegar first for atleast 20mins before you put any of the ingredients)
    http://melyskitchen.blogspot.com/2014/02/adobong-puso-ng-saging.html

    and here is a sample recipe in which you can use the dried banana flower.

    http://www.pinoychow.com/paksiw-na-pata-or-patatim/

    remember to remove the outer layer of the banana heart.

    photo source: http://imgkid.com/banana-heart.shtml
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
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  9. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    There's not much to the recipe it seems easy enough to do. I'll give it a try!

    Thanks for explaining :)
     
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  10. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Certainly interesting to see how this part of the tree can be used as a food.
     
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