Drought!

Discussion in 'Other' started by ClissAT, Apr 8, 2016.

  1. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    How is everyone coping if they are in drought conditions right now?

    Things are already very grim here near Pomona, SE Qld.

    I have just done my rainfall charts for the first quarter & there is already 100ml less than the 2014 drought over the same period in my area!
    I have been watering, including the chook pen, every day all year.
    But because there hasn't been enough rain to fill the dam, I am now having to cut watering to some plants, fruit trees & vegie garden beds. I feel like the hangman, making the decision to stop watering some things that will most likely die now during winter when it will really get dry.
    Usually this would be something I might have to consider in late October or November if there hadn't been enough storms. Certainly not in April!
    The chook pen is next to be cut off the watering schedule. I might try to keep the chia & pigeon pea going until it flowers because that is food for chuckies.
     
  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    We've had much less rain over the past 12 months than the year before even though the dry days between rainfall has been less.

    Normally, we have ground water running out of the hill from about mid summer to start of winter due to the preceeding wet season but this is the second year in a row when we'll head into the dry season over winter with dry ground down the bottom of our property and no water in the creek.

    It still looks pretty green around here due to the regular falls but below the surface a foot it's dry.
     
  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yes Mark, that green look is called a green drought.
    I have it here too although the grass has really browned & crisped off this last week.
    We get heavy fogs every morning being in the Mary River Valley & occasional very light short showers from the SE which is just enough to keep the grass green.
    But the ground under the thatch is completely dust dry.
    I've been digging holes to plant my pawpaws recently & the soil that the grass roots are in which is around 8cm max thick, is dusty when I fork into it. Then the schist rock & yellow clay under that is bone dry.
    Hard digging even with the crow bar.
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yep hard digging alright!

    I've planted a few new fruit trees lately and usually I'll hit damp clay under the topsoil but it reminded me of digging for opals at Lightning Ridge chipping away 20 feet below ground with a pick :D hard as rock!

    We have a bore, however it's greatly influenced by rainfall and whilst it rarely dries up it does get heavy through prolonged dry spells, which the plants don't like at all...

    I hope we have an unusually wet winter.
     
  5. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    We went down south last week and it was as dry as. One thing that stood out was the amount of climate engineering that we saw going on (google it). Some days it was so bad it was hard to see hills in the distance through all the haze. I guess while the Co2 AGW myth is perpetuated people are not going to wake up to the real cause even though they can see it with their own eyes? Funny how Al Gore came out just around the time that climate engineering started to take off in earnest. Now it's been going on so long that most people think it's normal. :) The hygroscopic particles being applied suck all the moisture out of the air before clouds can even form. Compare the drought in the U.S. with the elevated amount of geoengineering activity over there.
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Do you mean like cloud seeding? Like what they are doing in Tassy at the moment...
     
  7. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Nope, the opposite.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_radiation_management

    TONS of info out there but it's going fullscale since the 90's at least. Do some googling on geoengineering or climate engineering, then go outside and look up. :) Not 'too 'bad' along coastal QLD but NSW was atrocious last week...and dry as a desert.
     
  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Geez that does not sound good at all... Messing with nature like that is quite disturbing!

    Here we are debating co2 and how we need to limit gasses but at the same time scientists are pumping other gasses into the atmosphere to reflect the sun essentially using the world as a big lab experiment.

    This is the first I have heard about sun reflection etc and I'm not liking the concept at all.

    Yes, using less man made chemicals or cleaning up pollution is a good thing obviously but we shouldn't mess with nature to "fix" nature that's just a recipe for disaster.
     
  9. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    Yeah. Have been researching this issue for the better part of ten years, can link to numerous articles and patents for anyone who's interested or who doubts what they are seeing.
     
  10. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Of course the other way to do natural geoengineering is to just leave the existing trees in place & plant a heap more to replace the millions lost to land clearing.
    Gum trees give off their very own protecting gasses as they heap up.
     
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  11. Director

    Director Valued Member Premium Member

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    But that would make sense and be totally at odds with the lunatics who are running the planet these days. :)
     
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  12. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yeh, I'm just glad I won't be around to witness the total destruction unless there is a major event in the next 30yrs.
    I'm 60 now, so hoping to avoid most of the backlash from nature & those stupid moronic people you refer to.

    I will die safe in the knowledge that nature will win in the end & it will be the humans that loose out. Although they may take most of the animal & plant kingdom with them, but the earth is an old hand at repairing & repositioning the natural balance.
     
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  13. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    suppoooooosed to be some rain coming for SEQ :cheers:
     
  14. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah looking forward to some big rain tomorrow to fill up my duck dam...
     
  15. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yep we got lots of rain, great as the place was so dry. Think we got between 100-200mm.
     
  16. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I got 80ml total which filled all the tanks but didn't cause any runoff for the dams.

    Now the westerly wind is here in a big way. Branches down, little old sheds buckling under the weight of the blustery gusts. House shaking & wind chimes clattering loudly. I'll have to take some down I think as it seems the wind will continue all night.

    The east coast low that was expected to form off SE QLd has formed a bit north of Sydney so they are coping the massive gales.
     
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  17. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah wind is big tonight - I fear my walk around the backyard tomorrow... :facepalm:

    My dam filled up so I guess that's a good thing!
     
  18. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    So, this is Australia, land of drought & flooding rain.

    Have you seen the damage down south?

    Gosh they copped it bad.

    It seems the worst is over but it'll be a slow, heart wrenching clean up no doubt.

    On the chook forum people are talking about their poultry getting flooded out.

    I guess that would also apply to all animals, pets, livestock & wild critters.

    I read of some people who just had their chooks in what could be called a dog house with no roost above ground, just the nest boxes on the ground & a very small enclosure.

    I sure hope those people took their poultry into their house.
     
  19. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Big rain!

    Yes they sure got hammered worse than us down south.

    It still surprises me how people could be so stupid to drive through flooded causeways but 3 died in car drownings nevertheless...

    Our chooks were nice and dry and no trees crashed through the pen in this storm thankfully.
     
  20. GlennoFromKenno

    GlennoFromKenno Member Premium Member GOLD

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    The big rain was mostly welcome but destroyed all my lettuce plants. They may recover, but in my shady yard, stuff grows so slow. They were just coming into a size for harvesting too :'(
     
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