Question Do you plant seeds or seedlings?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Comfort, Feb 9, 2017.

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Do you use Seeds or Seedlings in the garden?

  1. Only Seeds

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Primarily Seeds

    16.7%
  3. Both Seeds and Seedlings

    75.0%
  4. Primarily Seedlings

    8.3%
  5. Only Seedlings

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Comfort

    Comfort Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Share your gardening style... do you prefer to start with seeds or seedlings.
     
  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    depends.................. ;)
     
  3. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Seeds take time and extra care to get them to fruition. Seedlings are a head start and a more sure result if they're taken care of. A lot of hit and miss with seeds, I've found. But then I might be sourcing out dodgy seeds...
     
  4. Comfort

    Comfort Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    One advantage of using your own seeds is each generation gets use to your conditions...
     
  5. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Definitely seeds for curcubits (cucumbers, cantaloupe, zucchini), seeds or seedlings for tomatoes. capsicums etc, having a disastrous time at the moment with any salad leaf seeds (too hot I suspect). Disasters for seedlings include - onions (nightmare to separate, don't get any size if you don't separate). Oh and I grew a truck load of Dragon fruit from seed...they're growing well, but I don't think I'll see fruit for YEARS!
     
  6. letsgo

    letsgo Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Both. But I think it will be primarily seeds.
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    There are advantages of both as we know... I guess I've always felt a plant germinated by seed in place to grow seems to always do better than a transplanted seedling.

    I often buy cheap seedlings from the markets it helps the local economy and gives the crop a head start particularly for late plantings.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I like the idea of supporting our local nurseries and growers. Our local markets in Toowoomba feature a few of these guys, and they do okay but there are only so many seedlings you can buy and plant. Especially the eucalypts (one guy brings in heaps of these)!
     
  9. Helen Auriga

    Helen Auriga Ecological Farming & Landcare Premium Member GOLD

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    Location:
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    Peas and beans we plant seeds.
    Tomatoes this year have been seedlings donated by a friend who had them growing out of his compost pile, ( it's amusing to wait and see what type of tomato you are going to get).
    Eucalypts we plant seed but do not transplant seedlings into the paddock until they are large enough.
    P.S. The tomatoes turned out to be bush tomatoes about the size of a ping- pong ball and very tasty.
     
  10. David - coona

    David - coona Active Member Premium Member

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    Another vote for both here. Roots get down as seed in situ, likewise peas and beans. Pretty much everything else we start in the greenhouse/nursery in pots and transplant out. Saves on garden bed space, multiple crops per bed per year (if you time it right) I'll let you know when we get it right:)
     
  11. Sherry Robitson

    Sherry Robitson Texas Bluebonnets Premium Member GOLD

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    If I only need a 2 or three of something I buy transplants. I like to start tomatoes and peppers in late January and do step up potting as the plants grow bigger. This gives a big head start because Texas heat is unpredictable and having larger plants out as sum as possible is a big plus. I can also nurture and fertilize them and get healthier plants than I can buy.
    Another things is that plants in nurseries get moved around and mislabeled, especially tomato plants. So frustrating when your first tomato you’ve waited on for weeks is not the variety you anticipated.
     
  12. DarrenP

    DarrenP Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Seeds are definitely the cheaper option, and are the way to go if you are after a particular variety. I like to buy organic, non-GMO seeds; they seem to have a better strike rate than the commercial ones.
    Having said that, seedlings are a good way to get a head start in a new season. As an example, I planted two varieties of tomato seedlings, as well as some seeds. This should prolong my harvest.
     
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