Question Can you buy grafted type A and B avocados trees?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Renee Shields, Mar 17, 2019.

  1. Renee Shields

    Renee Shields Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Western Sydney
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    hello everyone,

    I’m really new to gardening but I’m wanting an avo tree as avos are so expensive to buy and from being in western Sydney they are also terrible quality. I want an avo tree but I only really have room for one. I realise that you need type a and type b in order for cross pollination to occur. I was wondering if there is a type A and B tree that is grafted together like you get with lemon and lime trees?
     
  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    624
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Hi Renee and welcome to the forum.
    Yes you can buy types A & B grafted.
    I bought a pair a few years ago when I went to the SEQld garden show at Nambour.
    But you are down in Sydney, but you should still be able to get them from a good supplier. Might have to go to a wholesaler.
    Mine ended up dying due to my crap soil and inconsistent rain.
    So that's something to think about because each tree will cost about $45-50. They cost so much because they are triple grafted, roots, stem, fruiting branches which takes around 4yrs.
    So if you are definitely doing this, begin fixing your soil now where the trees will be planted in readiness to plant in late winter. They hate rich freshly fertilized or composted soil.
     
  3. Renee Shields

    Renee Shields Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Western Sydney
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Ok well our soil is pretty crap in general. It’s dry and crumbly so I’ll havw to look into what soil they will need and google a wholesaler. Thank you for your advise!
     
  4. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    624
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Renee don't buy soil or compost from a garden centre or bagged from the hardware or nursery. We've discussed it here in other threads about how much of a waste of money it is and how heart breaking it can be.

    Make your own compost in a styro broccoli box with some kitchen scraps, lawn clippings and garden waste along with some dry leaves, lucerne mulch and sugarcane mulch which you buy bagged at the garden centre. I mention using both mulches simultaneously because they each harbour different bacteria and fungi, both of which are important for good compost making and breaking down in the soil. These mulches along with the dead leaves, provide the brown and dry components of your compost batch. The brown dry components should form 50% of the volume of the compost layers.

    Chopped up leaves from pruning around the vegie garden make great bulk and a large amount of green component for the compost along with a bit of fresh or pelletized chook manure to provide the nitrogen to break down the greens and browns. Then the kitchen waste provides more green, plus some nitrogen plus the wet layer and feeds worms that will help your compost break down if they get into the box. You could buy a bag of mushroom compost to add to it but that stuff has been sterilized until it is just a bulk friable medium only with no other benefit. Same goes for bagged commercial cow, sheep or chook manure. If you can buy these locally on the side of the road, get as much as you can as they are still alive and will benefit both compost and soil. Even if they have a few weed seeds its ok.

    Keep topping up your box with more layers until the its full. Decide where you want to plant your trees and make a BIG hole at least 60cm across and 40cm deep. Have several buckets of coir peat well soaked for several days ahead, then dig it into your hole along with your newly made compost.
    Fill the hole back to make it level with the surrounding ground then cover with more mulch and leave it until the end of winter.

    Then go and buy your trees so you can plant both on the same day. Remember an avo tree will grow to 4m wide and high at least, possibly wider, and they need full sun or they will go scraggly and push over all others nearby to claim the sunlight. They will also become deseased if not getting enough sun and or the root system is too wet or lacking excellent drainage. A north facing slope with nice deep soil is a good place.

    The pH needs to be within a fairly narrow range too, slightly acidic is just right.

    At this point I want to add that an avo tree will cost you as much annually as buying the fruit from the fruit shop or supermarket. The only benefit is you can have a fruit hanging on the tree usually when you want one. But thats only if you dont have bats, birds, possums, etc that steal the fruit. Your tree will need spraying with all manner of big chemicals many times a year because it is a grafted tree and therefore weakened genetics as a trade off for more and bigger fruit. They are hard to grow and heartbreaking because they will die at the drop of a hat.
    But if you succeed, they are a great confidence booster and if your tree is producing a heap of fruit that you give away, you can score many browny points with your friends!
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Common

    Common Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brisbane, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    I bought a Hass and a Reed from Daley's Fruits ~6 months ago, had to go on a waitlist and they SMS you when they are available for payment/shipping. Have planted one in the garden (SE Qld) and the other is still awaiting ground planting but is in a large pot.

    I'd echo ClissAT's comments about the soil quality, I gave mine no great consideration and the Hass that I planted in the ground has been a lot slower growing and on the struggle compared to the pot raised Reed. But in my situation I think it's more to do with poor drainage for the Hass.

    It looks like they have a selection on their site still (I can't post any links - new user) - depending on variety availability varies.

    On the other hand - I've also started the process of growing some seeds to attempt my own grafting hopefully in the future *fingers crossed*
     
  6. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    624
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Hi Common and welcome (i guess you've started your own 'hello' thread already).
    The reason for grafting it they use fairly unique root stock that will tolerate soil/weather from certain areas of Australia.
    Thats why often the nursery will say this one is suited to Qld or suited to weter areas etc.
    When you set your own seedling from the fruit of a grafted tree you get the roots of the variety of the fruiting brach that was grafted on which generally are not very strong at withstanding root rot or certain soils or probably also predisposed to getting lethal fungal infections.
    Avocados are notorious for getting lethal fungal infections both of the roots and the branches. Thats why they are grafted.
     
  7. Renee Shields

    Renee Shields Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Western Sydney
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Thank you so much I’ll definately do all of that! The other day I was looking at trying to find the broccoli box to start compost as suggested. I think with all these tips I probably won’t kill the tree!!
     
  8. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    624
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical

    that's the spirit, Renee! :thumbsup:
    Did you succeed in finding a box?
    Shouldn't be hard if you have a fruit shop nearby.
     
  9. Renee Shields

    Renee Shields Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Western Sydney
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    No not yet the shop threw them out the day before
     
Loading...

Share This Page