Bokashi tea and liquid fertiliser

Pauljm

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Hi all,
I have been googling answers but thought I would ask on here for some clarification. Is the liquid from our bokashi bucket a replacement for liquid fertiliser? I have been using it but am unsure if it Makes any difference or not. I was at the nursery yesterday and bought a $5 bag of alpaca manure. I was going to make some liquid fertiliser out of it. Do I just put some in a sealed bucket and fill with water or is there more science to it?
Cheers,
Paul
 

ClissAT

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Hi Paul, the liquid from any compost is never complete but it is still a good fertilizer.
Depending on what went into the Bokashi, you might get something resembling 'compete' or way out of whack.
I would mix it with other liquid fert to be on the safe side.

As for the alpaca poo, it might be like sheep in nutritional value.
Sheep is not complete but is a good additive to compost heaps that are working well.
Also well rotted sheep manure is a good additive to a new bed that you are working up.
Sheep manure tends to create nice spongy compost that holds moisture well.....until it is allowed to dry out, then it goes horrible!

As for making liquid fert from the alpaca poo, I think it would be rather the same as any other manure.
Put some in an old pillow case or similar bag to 1/5th full maximum, to make a 'tea bag' & add to a 20lt drum of water.
Leave for 1-2 days with lid on but give it a gentle dunking twice daily.
Then remove the tea bag & break that liquid down to 'tea' strength (1:10 usually) & apply with a watering can.
You can put the tea bag straight into a new drum of water for a second, then 3rd round.
Then add the depleted manure directly to the compost heap or dig into your garden in a section that wont get planted straight away.

I would add the bokashi liquid into the watering can of alpaca tea fert.
The Bokashi liquid might have a higher nitrogen level than the alpaca so the 2 might go well together. But I think to be on the safe side, add a bit of slow release granular fert or chicken poo based pellets also so you can be sure the plants are getting everything they need. There are trace elements that vegies need that will definitely not be in either of the above mentioned liquids.

To add the nitrogen, you could just firstly try a side dressing of blood & bone with the additive of 10% potassium. Put that on first & scuffle it into the soil along the sides of the plants then water the liquid over. The usual application is 1 adult single handful per meter row or about a dessertspoon per large pot plant.

You'll soon know if it is working or not. The plants should get new leaves within a week or so if they are a bit nutritionally deprived now. The new leaves should be lime to mid green & grow fairly fast. But if you get new leaves that are crinkly, yellow, red, motley or curled then the liquid was way out of balance & you will have to add some Power Feed or similar to rebalance.
 
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Pauljm

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May 8, 2018
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Hi ClissAT,
Thank you so much for your detailed reply I will give it a go. Very kind of you to take the time and share your knowledge it is much appreciated.
Thanks again,
Paul
 

Justin M

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I currently use a combination of Bokashi and Hot composting to breakdown all of my kitchen waste. Everything organic goes into my Bokashi (meat, egg shells, fruit and vegetables, left over drinks) once the bucket is filled I drain all excess liquid to a container for liquid fertilizer. The solids are put in my hot compost where it is joined by the waste from my chickens and their bedding. I have been doing this for about 3 months and the compost is looking great.

As far as fertilizing my vegetable garden I use the Bokashi liquid in conjunction with Charlie carp as my only fertiliser during the growing season. Before replanting the beds I till in manure and compost to ensure the soil is well prepared for the new season.

So far the brassicas and beets have grown very well using this method. I will have to see how the next season goes as this is my first growing season on a new property (new house build).