Apple tree help

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Letsgokate, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Several of the leaves on my tropical Apple have turned yellow. Just started in the last few days and happened very quickly. When I touch the very yellow leaves they fall off. I've consulted google and all I can find is Necrotic leaf blotch (NLB) can any one confirm this or tell me what it is.

    How do I treat it?

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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Is NLB a virus, bacterial or fungal infection? Each of those types of diseases has their own little indicators.
    Letsgo are the yellow leaves the oldest on their branch or evenly dispersed across all ages of leaves?

    If only the oldest on each branch are affected then it could be a simple case of running out of soil moisture.
    Apples need regular & usually copious watering or they stress out.
    Most trees carry several diseases in their systems but they are kept under control.
    Much like we are always being exposed to many different bacteria & viruses but we don't get sick because generally we are reasonable healthy.
    Same, same for the tree. But if it gets stressed by lack of water, various problems can rear their ugly heads.

    Yellowing of the oldest leaves is a sign that the tree can't move potassium through its system from the ground so it cannibalizes its oldest leaves & mines them for various minerals. This causes the leaf to turn yellow due to lack of chlorophyll. The leaf dies quickly.

    The tree may also have other diseases such as that you name, but the reason it is showing up may simply be insufficient water. Maybe ants have set up house in the root system.
    Or conversely even if there has been enough water it could be due to the unusual & overly hot humid days or hot dry winds we've had in SE Qld recently that the tree is not designed to cope with.

    So in the short term letsgo, check the soil or growing medium is evenly moist right through with no dry patches caused by ants nests or similar, spray the whole tree & soil with Seasol & protect from these hot windy days.

    Give the tree a week then repeat the whole process & wait another week. By the end of that you should see new leaf growth.

    There is however, another reason for the change of leaf colour that may not be due to disease. This unusual weather could be causing the tree to move into dormancy early due to stress. The normal process is for the tree to move minerals back from leaves into the branches where the nutrition sits & waits for the next season to arrive. Then the leaves turn reddish (usually) & fall off.

    But if your tree is stressed it might be moving minerals in the wrong order, so the leaf is turning yellow first & that could also be the reason for the patches & mottling on the leaf.
     
  3. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks @ClissAT for taking the time to reply, your advice and wisdom is always appreciated.

    Most of my fruit trees are on a dripper system getting watered every night at 7.30pm for 15mins every day. I've increased that to 25 min and will do that for a while in this really hot weather.

    The apple tree is question as does all my other fruit trees have lots of new growth. I've just given them all a good hand water and I do keep an eye on all of them to check for any signs of heat stress. Like you say that can show itself in many ways. I will certainly give the apple tree some Seasol and if fact do that for all the trees. Thanks

    I'm having a lot of problems with possums eating the leaves on my 3 apples trees, I sprayed them last week with a possum deterrent called Scat and have set up the auto sensor water sprayer for night time use. Possums are a real issue in this area. As the fruit trees are in pots, I can move them, we are considering a fully enclosed area for them but still deciding.

    Thanks again for you advice, I'll keep a very close eye on them.
     
  4. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Possums are becoming a real pest here too.
    Now with drought they are raiding the gardens for every little thing to eat.
    Even the half grown coffee beans did no stand a chance against them & the bloody crows!
    I found the possums were happy to chew through the knitted white bird netting, so although it initially kept the king parrots out of my tomatoes, the possums came along at night & chewed holes which the parrots then utilized in the morning!
    Now they wont leave the new young plants alone. It's like they are saying "There was once food in this place so there must always be food & we will trample these plants every night just incase there might be one baby tomato!"
    So I will be closing in a section of my verandah with galvanized bird cage wire (the 25mm square mesh) & putting a swinging door with a good latch on it.

    It's cheaper, easier & far less stressful to go buy organic produce at the local fruit shop! :thumbsdown:
     
  5. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Ha ha I know what you mean about it being less stressful, cheaper and easier to buy organic at the shops, between the heat, possums, caterpillars bugs, getting nutrients just right, water etc one does wonder. But it is satisfying to go and get you own bits to use it cooking or to it. It has made be appreciate those that grow food for the shops and why organic food is so expensive.

    I had some animal chew through the fruit fly net I had set up on one of the veggie beds. Had about 6 ripe tomatoes I was going to pick that were there the day before. They ate the lot and then went down the other end and ate some capsicums and went back out the same hole. Not sure it if was a rat, possum or birds.

    I like the idea of setting up a electric fence and zap the suckers :D

    Your idea of fencing off the veranda sounds like a good one.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  6. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Have you ever watched possums walking along electricity wires flapping in the wind from a storm?
    They are bloody experts!
    Impossible to zap them!
    The lady who rents my cabin is sick of them getting her flowers so she got a trap which has previously caught rats &a possum.
    She set it in the late arvo then went out & a little later I saw the crows come & get the apple out of the cage for their kid!
    How can you win?
    But yes it is very satisfying to harvest your own produce. Even more satisfying when you have been successful at outsmarting the blighters! :tease:
     
  7. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yeah we borrowed a trap, and it didn't matter how sensitive we made it something was getting in there and eating the mango without setting off the trap.

    We are going to get and setup security camera's so we can see what the little rascals are doing and then we might have more info on how to stop them. One can only hope.
     
  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    We have trees all around our property and it also backs on wooded bushland but possums aren't a major problem. Yes they're around and yes they do eat produce etc but they're never devastating.

    When I set-up our first raised beds about 8-10 years ago I initially placed them close to big gum trees and I quickly realised I had to fully net the beds otherwise the possums would climb down and practically jump from the tree onto the garden and eat everything!

    However, since moving all out raised beds central and away from large trees we see very little damage done from possums.

    I'm not exactly sure why our possum problem is better but I suspect the location of the veggie garden being in the open means the animal has to scurry across open lawn into an open garden and might feel vulnerable... so that in itself is a deterrent. Just guessing.

    Possums still visit our orchard and grab the odd fruit through the night but it's not like they eat heaps so it doesn't matter and any prized fruit we really want (which aren't plentiful) like mangoes, I bag them separately. I have been trialling a new anti-rip bagging system that protects against fruit fly and animals so far so good - my latest video touches on it. Mango fruit don't taste like they used to

    It's odd that your possums are eating shoots from your apple tree; however, they are shoot grazers and they even eat tomato seedlings (which are technically poisonous) so I suppose it shouldn't be a surprise.

    Do you have a dog? An outdoor one...
     
  9. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    We have a dog but she is an inside one. I think exclusion will be the only way to keep the possums away. It's a case of how we go about that. We have been told by neighbours that others have grown fruit and veggies in the area but gave up due to the possums. And as I've mentioned before a person down the road has a big exclusion area set up. The possums etc must think this is a good area to raised their family.
     
  10. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    This maybe totally off base but where we used to live in the Adelaide Hills a neighbour of ours was having lots of trouble with rats eating his veggies & he decided that what they were after was the water in the veggies not really food so he put out dishes of water for the rats & they stopped eating his veggies. Seemed strange putting out dishes of water for the rats but it worked. Bit of lateral thinking there.
     
  11. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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  12. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    I remember seeing that thread Mark and thinking they look perfect. Since then I tried it with netting a garden bed but couldn't get the poly piping to stay upright and support the nets. They kept sagging down with time. I didn't have anything like steel wiring to run through them so I gave up on that idea (plus I was so time poor).
     
  13. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Also probably a little off topic...when netting (insect nets) veggie patches, how does everyone allow access to the patch itself for maintenance or hand fertilisation? Do you have to pull the whole net off and then replace when you're done? I guess "perfect" flowers would be OK like tomatoes, as you could just set and forget...
     
  14. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Well I'm gonna give this a try, Flatland.
    The crows got my corn 5 days before harvest!
    I managed to secure a few immature cobs plus the second set of cobs under the leaf axis which will make good stir fry.
    The plants then went to the horses. So everyone but me benefited from my hard fought for corn. :thumbsdown:
     
  15. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Horses love sweetcorn plants so at least you will be able to see happy horses
     
  16. Lois

    Lois Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I have a red apple tree seeding the bigger one in photo, and a green apple tree seedling. For this winter I am thinking of keeping them in the greenhouse which is on the northern side of the house. Shades our verandah wonderfully in summer and cuts the wind down.
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    A) Do they need fertiliser at this size?
    B) How often do you repot?
    C) How big till planted in garden?

    Regards Lois Langley
     
  17. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Unless the apple fruit parents were heritage open pollinated varieties, you could get anything from those 2 seedling trees.
    For example, just being organic is no inference that the fruit is open pollinated.
    It most likely will still be grafted varieties.
    Just be aware that you might spend many years lovingly caring for your 2 apple trees to finally get bitter, tough skinned tiny apples like crab apples only worse.
    As for your seedlings, they need a fair bit of root room so if you see roots coming out the bottom it is time to plant up into the next size pot.
    They can be held in the greenhouse for this one year prior to planting out.
    Yes they need fertilizer. Just a general house plant food is good enough at this stage.
    They don't need special fruit tree fertilizer until they begin flowering & fruiting. Something like osmocote slow release 6mth will be good.
     
  18. Lois

    Lois Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thank you ClissAt. Guess I will repot one today so it can settle in before winter.
    Regards Lois Langley
     
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