18 months later..

Pauljm

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
GOLD
May 8, 2018
54
22
71
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Hi just thought I would show how my garden has developed over the last 18 months. It started as a landscaping project as our steep backyard was too hard to mow. I built the “landing” up the back first off just as a place to sit and enjoy the view. As I started digging for stairs etc I needed a place for the soil so I started building garden beds. I now have 11 x 2400 x 600 to 1200 beds. All materials lugged up the back by hand. From the front of the house I can’t even push half a barrow up the steep path so it’s buckets all the way. Anyway I’m happy with the result and veggies produced so far. Love seeing my 4year old eating fresh veggies straight off the plant. A very addictive but very satisfying hobby. Thanks for looking...
A91271AC-25E7-4D70-A6E2-2ACB7DB8D9B0.jpeg 003B0CFB-D38F-4AEF-9724-ECC299B2A3E9.jpeg 2FF4B0C1-D6F2-483F-8E0B-67FD9435B64D.jpeg 8C54CC12-3FB1-4A4D-9DEE-9D69AE3BB19E.jpeg CABD4AB1-C9B2-4943-A652-8B8C28C90DB4.jpeg E8A9A7FF-6E82-4764-AC81-02B4CA7185F6.jpeg C30E9DEC-22E8-4664-8507-8BEBB5D8B984.jpeg 0DF20849-B484-4818-9500-97B031F71B96.jpeg
 

Attachments

Letsgokate

Valued Member
Premium Member
Nov 12, 2014
910
393
281
SE Queensland, Australia
letsgotravelaustralia.com
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Wow that is awesome. So much hard yakka but the results are well worth your effort. Well done looks great. It is so lovely when the little ones is the fresh produce and show and interest in what is growing and how things grow etc.
 

ClissAT

Valued Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Sep 27, 2015
1,842
900
361
Pomona, Qld
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Gosh Paul, so much hard work. :heat:
But will be worth it in another year.
I love how you made a border with the cabbages.:chuffed:
 

Jenny

Active Member
Premium Member
Sep 8, 2017
52
20
41
South Africa
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
Very inspirational pics, thank you! I mainly grow my veggies, herbs and so on in containers on a very big patio, because my available garden space is also on a relatively steep slope. Your photos have now inspired me to start thinking of ways to make productive use of my sloped garden space as well.
 

Lois

Active Member
Premium Member
Nov 15, 2017
73
39
41
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Wow that is wonderful. Good photos and an inspiring message.
 

Pauljm

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
GOLD
May 8, 2018
54
22
71
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Thanks everyone for the kind words.... it’s funny how it rubs off on people as both my neighbours have since built veg gardens after witnessing (and tasting) the fruits of my labour! Also got mum growing some beans and stuff in pots which is great for both her physical and mental health.
As for the garden it’s just a shame we don’t get a bit more winter sun... it disappears behind the sloping block in winter...these tomato plants grew very well the last 2 months In a new bed that I expected to get more sun than it does. The fruit haven’t got any bigger in the last 2 weeks or so and I assume this disease as shown below is due to lack of sun? Also want to get some citrus trees growing up the back corner but am hesitant due to lack of sun. Cheers again for replies....Paul
93D75830-FFE7-4315-A316-14185D25DDC1.jpeg
 

Kasalia

http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/
Premium Member
Dec 15, 2015
242
152
161
Mid North Coast
retired2006.blogspot.com.au
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Just caught up with your landscaping project. Love how you used the slope, mine goes the other way but not as steep. Pain when you can not use a cart and have to weed with buckets only. Your slope will definitely keep you fit.
Lotsmof veg. grow with partial shade so chase that up for your garden. Pots you can move around also.
Fantastic job Paul
 

ClissAT

Valued Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Sep 27, 2015
1,842
900
361
Pomona, Qld
Climate
Sub-Tropical
It's always difficult in the garden when light is an issue. However you seem to be achieving as best results as are possible.

The bruising on the fruit is fruit fly (or similar little beasty) attack and could be due to weaker fruit from low light.

Yes you are right re the lack of light but its causing slightly differnt issues than you might expect.
The discolouration on the stems and leaves is from too much moisture or lack of air flow.
This would be due to lack of direct sun which would dry out the stems and leaves and evaporate the excess moisture eminating from the soil or residual moisture from watering.

When plants have to stretch to reach the light, their calcium cycle gets interfered. Their stems get too long and weak so are more prone to problems. However applying more calcium is not the answer. More light is the answer to aid the photosynthesis which will strengthen the plant so it can utilize the existing fertility.

Try for bigger fruit by applying some foliar potassium. I find the pink bottle of Searle potassium is cheap and works.

Check your pH to be sure everything is as good as can be.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mark

OskarDoLittle

Valued Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Jan 10, 2016
359
164
186
Brisbane
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Thanks everyone for the kind words.... it’s funny how it rubs off on people as both my neighbours have since built veg gardens after witnessing (and tasting) the fruits of my labour! Also got mum growing some beans and stuff in pots which is great for both her physical and mental health.
As for the garden it’s just a shame we don’t get a bit more winter sun... it disappears behind the sloping block in winter...these tomato plants grew very well the last 2 months In a new bed that I expected to get more sun than it does. The fruit haven’t got any bigger in the last 2 weeks or so and I assume this disease as shown below is due to lack of sun? Also want to get some citrus trees growing up the back corner but am hesitant due to lack of sun. Cheers again for replies....Paul
View attachment 3281
I feel your pain regarding lack of sun. I had a great veggie spot till the neighbours planted a hedge which is now about 5metres tall and blocks all the afternoon sun. I've had to stop growing most things (lettuce goes OK...but I don't eat much salad in winter!!) until the angle of the sun is higher in summer. Even then it will be interesting to see how many hours of sun the patch gets as the hedge grows even taller. I've got a few citrus espaliered down the wall directly under their hedge...kaffir lime and bay tree are OK as no fruit required, and they're established enough to cope by the look of things...but very little fruit on the lemon & lime now and no new flowers. Whereas the citrus in full sun around the corner are coming out in heaps of flowers now.